Tag Archives: heritage

PAST:PRESENT:FUTURE schools workshops at Fabrica

Fabrica – Past:Present:Future

PAST: PRESENT: FUTURE is a project, funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, which is being undertaken by Fabrica Gallery and some of its volunteers. This project will bring to light previously unexplored history about the exhibition space, a restoration of some of the churches key original features and an amazing learning resource in the form of a book detailing the story of the Holy Trinity Church.

Fabrica have partnered with Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage to deliver a series of three years of Heritage Open Days activities. These open days will be taking place in September 2019, 2020 and 2021.

These take the form of creative schools workshops based on restoration of stained glass at Fabrica gallery – part of the Holy Trinity Church 200th building anniversary.

Fabrica said: ‘This project will bring to light previously unexplored history about the exhibition space, a restoration of some of the churches key original features and an amazing learning resource in the form of a book detailing the story of the Holy Trinity Church.’

The first of our first Heritage Open Days, co-produced with Strike A Light, we will be providing local primary schools with workshops exploring the beautiful stained glass in the building – click here for more info or to book

Further details of are available on the project blog: https://fabricapastpresentfuture.home.blog

The project is funded by the Heritage Fund

Symposium – History of Royal Sussex County Hospital (20th September)

Our Creative Director Nicola Benge will be saying a few words at this event, it’s free and celebrates BSUH history. Come along and join us!
 
Symposium about the history of Royal Sussex County Hospital, ethics in healthcare, and the opportunities for participatory arts practice in health settings.
Speakers include:

There will be three speakers at the event, held at Jubilee Library, including:

  • Dr Carina Westling, who is co-director of The Nimbus Group, will speak about the history of the hospital, from its inception, through to its current state, including how the hospital’s work with the community has changed, and how healthcare has developed over the 200-year history of the hospital.
  • Daniel Locke is an artist and illustrator who has been commissioned to work with the public to create a new artwork for the new Royal Sussex County Hospital. Daniel will talk about working with health workers, patients and the community, and how they have contributed to and inspired new artwork.
  • Dr Bobbie Farsides, Chair of Clinical and Biomedical Ethics at the University of Sussex, specialises in research on ante-natal screening and testing, reproductive technologies, palliative care and issues around death and dying, and will talk about how personal and organisational perspectives come together in healthcare ethics.
Venue: Jubilee Library, Jubilee Square, Brighton BN1 1GE
Date and time: 1:30pm registration, finish at 4:30pm. Free refreshments provided.
 
There are limited spaces for this event, book your ticket on Eventbrite to avoid disappointment.
 
The symposium is part of a commemorative programme of events supported by National Lottery Heritage Fund and Brighton & Sussex University Hospital NHS Trust.
 

PAST:PRESENT:FUTURE Fabrica gallery and Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage

Fabrica – Past:Present:Future

PAST: PRESENT: FUTURE is a project, funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, which is being undertaken by Fabrica Gallery and some of its volunteers. This project will bring to light previously unexplored history about the exhibition space, a restoration of some of the churches key original features and an amazing learning resource in the form of a book detailing the story of the Holy Trinity Church.

Fabrica have partnered with Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage to deliver a series of three years of Heritage Open Days activities. These open days will be taking place in September 2019, 2020 and 2021.

These take the form of creative schools workshops based on restoration of stained glass at Fabrica gallery – part of the Holy Trinity Church 200th building anniversary.

The first set of our activities at Fabrica will include:

* Discussion about stained glass and examples
* Workshop on making faux stained glass with children
* Differentiation activity with scratch relief stained glass effect

Fabrica said: ‘This project will bring to light previously unexplored history about the exhibition space, a restoration of some of the churches key original features and an amazing learning resource in the form of a book detailing the story of the Holy Trinity Church.’

The first of our first Heritage Open Days, co-produced with Strike A Light, we will be providing local primary schools with workshops exploring the beautiful stained glass in the building – click here for more info or to book

Further details of are available on the project blog: https://fabricapastpresentfuture.home.blog

The project is funded by the Heritage Fund

Shalom Sussex- The Jewish Community in WWI

 

Shalom Sussex- The Jewish Community in WWI

We’ve researching hard with our newest project, Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI.

In the coming weeks, we will be visiting The Keep archive, West Sussex Record Office and the National Archives to try to build a picture of life for Jewish people in Sussex during the First World War.

If you’d like to find out more about this theme or get involved as a volunteer researcher, receive training, meet new people and gain some useful skills, then please get in touch.

To find out more 
For further information, images and interviews, please contact:
Nicola Benge, Project Manager – Shalom Sussex

shalomsussexwwi@gmail.com

#shalomsussex

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

  

Shalom Sussex – New opportunities for research and activities

Shalom Sussex- The Jewish Community in WWI

This project enables people in Sussex to come together to preserve the memories and heritage of the Jewish people who lived locally during and post the First World War to collect these hidden histories.  Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant.

Our project researchers have been hard at work collecting photographs, newspaper clippings, and photos, as well as family tales passed down to help them build a clear picture of what life was like.

The main focus of our project will be the creation of a community history website to collect new archive material, as well as to share this heritage publicly. In keeping with Jewish tradition, this site will enable visitors to respect ancestors so that their passing can be commemorated.

If you’d like to get involved as a volunteer researcher, receive training, meet new people and gain some useful skills, then please get in touch by email: shalomsussexwwi@gmail.com

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

Partners
The Centre for German-Jewish Archives
Since its establishment in 1994, the Centre has developed into a major institution for the study of the history, culture and thought of Jews in Central Europe and for the training of a new generation of teachers and researchers in this field.
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/cgjs/

Jewish Historical Society of England
The Jewish Historical Society of England, the oldest historical and learned society of its kind in Europe was founded in 1893 by the foremost Anglo-Jewish scholars and communal leaders of the day.

Home

Jewish Care
Jewish Care is the largest health and social care organisation serving the Jewish community in London and the South East with over 70 centres and services, touching the lives of 10,000 people every week.
https://www.jewishcare.org/

To find out more 
For further information, images and interviews, please contact:
Nicola Benge, Project Manager – Shalom Sussex

shalomsussexwwi@gmail.com
#shalomsussex

About the project

  

Silver Foxes


Silver Foxes

Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage continues with our group aimed at older people called Silver Foxes. The group is based at Brooke Mead Sheltered Housing Scheme in Brighton  but open to anyone city wide over 60 years of age.

The group meets every Tuesday each week from 11-12pm.

We are exploring life memories, local history, trying new activities including bocca, table tennis and chair yoga to encourage participants to try new things, improve their memories and meet new people – oh and tea and biscuits of course!

We’d like to thank our funders for supporting this who are:

Homity TrustHealthy Neighbourhood Fund through the Trust for Developing Community, and The Boost Charitable Trust.

Thanks to all of these for helping to make this happen, and to Brighton and Hove City Council for in-kind support with the the venue.

https://strikealight.org/projects/current-projects/silver-foxes-group-starts/

Shalom Sussex – Get Involved!

Shalom Sussex- The Jewish Community in WWI

We’ve begun our newest project, Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI. Awarded through HLF’s First World War: then and now programme.

This project enables people in Sussex to come together to preserve the memories and heritage of the Jewish people who lived locally during and post the First World War to collect these hidden histories.  Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant.

Our project researchers have been hard at work collecting photographs, newspaper clippings, and photos, as well as family tales passed down to help them build a clear picture of what life was like.

The main focus of our project will be the creation of a community history website to collect new archive material, as well as to share this heritage publicly. In keeping with Jewish tradition, this site will enable visitors to respect ancestors so that their passing can be commemorated.

If you’d like to get involved as a volunteer researcher, receive training, meet new people and gain some useful skills, then please get in touch by email: shalomsussexwwi@gmail.com

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

Partners
The Centre for German-Jewish Archives
Since its establishment in 1994, the Centre has developed into a major institution for the study of the history, culture and thought of Jews in Central Europe and for the training of a new generation of teachers and researchers in this field.
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/cgjs/

Jewish Historical Society of England
The Jewish Historical Society of England, the oldest historical and learned society of its kind in Europe was founded in 1893 by the foremost Anglo-Jewish scholars and communal leaders of the day.

Home

Jewish Care
Jewish Care is the largest health and social care organisation serving the Jewish community in London and the South East with over 70 centres and services, touching the lives of 10,000 people every week.
https://www.jewishcare.org/

To find out more 
For further information, images and interviews, please contact:
Nicola Benge, Project Manager – Shalom Sussex

shalomsussexwwi@gmail.com
#shalomsussex

About the project

  

Feature in Jewish Care magazine 


Strike a Light was mentioned in a recent edition of care home Hyman Fine House in-house magazine about our Mazel Tov Brighton project.

The project celebrated links between Judaism and Brighton and Hove lives with residents of the Jewish Care charity run home Hyman Fine House. You can read the full magazine here!

 

https://strikealight.org/projects/mazel-tov-brighton/

The Unremembered project

IMG_2934We’re pleased to have been commissioned to make a wreath for The Unremembered project in Hastings and St Leonards.
This is with the Big Ideas Company to develop activities with local community groups to explore the history of the Labour Corps – service personnel during World War I, and often forgotten in this part of history.


We created the wreath with 22 older people who meet at the Elizabeth Blackman Centre in Hastings, East Sussex. The session was facilitated by Strike a Light Director Cath Tajima Powell and it went really well. We’re really pleased with how it’s turned out!

The Unremembered project background:
This project is about the Labour Corps – Service Personnel in the British Army who have essentially been pretty forgotten and aren’t really commemorated anywhere. The aim is to raise the profile of the Labour Corps and share this learning with community groups.
Who were the Labour Corps?

 Image: Collection of John Sheen author of histories of the Northumberland Fusiliers and Durham Light Infantry.
 The Labour Corps supplied the army with weapons and ammunition, food and fodder, water and fuel. They built and maintained roads and railways. They were essential to the war effort.
British and Allied Forces struggled to cope with the demand for manpower after the huge losses of men during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. From January 1917, manpower was drawn from the UK, China, India, South Africa, Egypt, Canada, the Caribbean and many other places within the British Empire.
Tens of thousands travelled thousands of miles to defend freedom and although they rarely saw service in the frontline, many died or were seriously injured. Today their contributions and sacrifice are all but forgotten. They are The Unremembered.


 
 
 
 
 

The Unremembered project

We’re pleased to have been commissioned to become a hub in Brighton and Hove by the Big Ideas Company to develop activities with local community groups to explore the history of the Labour Corps – service personnel during World War I, and often forgotten in this part of history.

The Unremembered project background:
This project is about the Labour Corps – Service Personnel in the British Army who have essentially been pretty forgotten and aren’t really commemorated anywhere. The aim is to raise the profile of the Labour Corps and share this learning with community groups.
Who were the Labour Corps?

 
 
 
 
 
 
Image: Collection of John Sheen author of histories of the Northumberland Fusiliers and Durham Light Infantry.
 The Labour Corps supplied the army with weapons and ammunition, food and fodder, water and fuel. They built and maintained roads and railways. They were essential to the war effort.
British and Allied Forces struggled to cope with the demand for manpower after the huge losses of men during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. From January 1917, manpower was drawn from the UK, China, India, South Africa, Egypt, Canada, the Caribbean and many other places within the British Empire.
Tens of thousands travelled thousands of miles to defend freedom and although they rarely saw service in the frontline, many died or were seriously injured. Today their contributions and sacrifice are all but forgotten. They are The Unremembered.
 Events:
Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage will deliver workshops in October and November 2018 in Brighton and Hove with ten different groups in ten different venues across Brighton and Hove to look at the theme of The Unremembered and to commemorate the Labour Corps service personnel and their experiences.
We will do this through engaging with freelancers and volunteers to deliver a series of history and resource led activities which focus on the art of making articulated paper puppets (a common past time a centenary ago) with community groups and families.
These puppets will be a mixture of pre-printed on cardboard outline templates which can then be designed, created and compiled by participants and for those with dexterity issues or the very young, pre-designed printed templates which can be assembled with support and displayed.  We will use fabric scraps, wrapping paper and wall paper to create overlaid uniforms for these puppets and to bring them to life.
We will also create activities to create dressing paper dolls, so creating the one dimensional paper dolls through templates which are cut out and then one dimensional clothing made relevant to our theme which can then be folded over the puppet body. These dolls were popular during WWI and were still printed then despite paper shortages.
Both these forms of puppet making are ideal for classroom and community projects because they are made with everyday craft supplies and reused materials.
The puppet theme for this project is two-fold – one that it is an engaging and accessible way to teach young people and community groups who are unaware of this lost period of history about the Labour Corps, and secondly that the puppets can be seen as a metaphor for the role of the Labour Corps in terms of having no control over their work or location, that they were moved around like mules and essentially treated as such too. This will be a way to valorise those men and celebrate their role.
This will help to remember some of the soldiers who served with the Labour Corps and their link with Sussex and draw this forgotten history into the light.