Tag Archives: grant

Flamenco for Dancing with Dementia project

flamenco-session showing-shawls

A flamenco session with dancer Helena from Duende Flamenco at Hyman Fine House care home run by Jewish Care charity in Brighton as part of our Dancing with Dementia project. Ole!

Strike a Light-Arts & Heritage has been awarded a grant by the Trust for Developing Communities – Healthy Community Fund for a Brighton project called Dancing with Dementia.

We’ll be working with dementia sufferers in a care home in the city as a pilot project from December 2016 to Spring 2017 with a variety of music and performance and freelance practitioners.

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Strike a Light starts new project – The Orange Lilies

Heritage Lottery Fund awards £9,900 to The Orange Lilies Project by Strike a Light to mark First World War Centenary

Gertrude Scoggins ticket lady 1916.jpg

Image: Gertrude Coggins, ticket collector, Brighton Station 1915-1919 (centre, seated). Photographs by kind permission of Gerald Wheatley. Thanks to the East Sussex in World War I project.

Today, Strike a Light, in partnership with Brighton & Hove Library and Information Service, and Fabrica received £9,900 from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) for a project, The Orange Lilies – Brighton and Hove Soldiers in the Somme, in Brighton and Hove. Awarded through HLF’s First World War: then and now programme, the project will focus on the city’s legacy of the Somme and a significant event on the eve of this (where huge numbers of Brighton soldiers fell), The Battle of Boar’s Head (also known as The Day that Sussex Died), as a key part of WWI, and its’ subsequent impact on Brighton and Hove.

From June 2016 – June 2017, intergenerational arts and heritage organisation Strike a Light and partners will – through key activities, training, collaboration and mentoring – work with young people to commemorate the effects of the Battle of the Somme on the city, uncovering Brighton’s Great War heritage for future generations. Using archives and artefacts to inform creative learning, our unique approach involves young people researching and producing a series of short films to share this WWI centenary theme; creating textile interpretations of significant battles; and attending talks and study days; whilst receiving support from local historians, including a local Royal Sussex Regimental military expert.

The Royal Sussex Regiment acquired The Orange Lilies tag after receiving permission from William of Orange to bear orange facings on uniforms. This regimental nickname continued into the 20th century, hence our project title.

We will highlight notable lives including Bob Whiting, a Brighton and Hove Albion footballer serving in France before going AWOL during the Battle of the Somme, Albert Patching from a well-known Portslade family, and Arthur Virgo who died at Boar’s Head on 30th June 1916. We will research Brighton born soldiers who served with the Southdowns, and three local ‘pals’ battalions: the 11th, 12th and 13th Royal Sussex Regiment. Recruited from all over Sussex, but significantly volunteer soldiers in Brighton and Hove who represented a wide cross section of this community.

We will produce a series of creative outcomes, remembering those lost at the key Battle of Boar’s Head and The Somme, memorialising soldiers fighting during this epic part of the Great War. These local men are the ordinary, forgotten heroes of WWI, also known as Lowther’s Lambs. There is no memorial to the Battle of the Boar’s Head in Brighton. We will address that through connecting this tangible heritage with the present, creating a digital monument accessible to all, promoting wider public knowledge of the centenary, sharing new research with participants and volunteers, new audiences and project partners, and with young and older people, through events, heritage activities and film.

To mark the Centenary of the First World War, the project will enable local people in Brighton and Hove to come together to preserve the memories and heritage of the people who lived through the Somme. Volunteers will collect photographs, newspaper clippings, documents, letters and photos of keepsakes, as well as family tales passed down to help them build a clear picture of what life was really like, with support from project partners, specialist academics, military advisers, local authority employees and archivists, as well as young people, older groups, participants and project staff.

LITA - Black Rock.jpg

Image: Postcard of Black Rock sent by the wife of a Brighton Somme soldier. Thanks to the Letter in the Attic project from QueenSpark Books.

A wider, digital audience will be reached through our films, blog and social media presence extending the project legacy for another seven years, for future researchers, relatives and the local community to benefit. With help from professionals, the information gathered will be digitally recorded and an on-line interactive archive will be created where everyone can access and contribute information. The archive will allow the public to discuss, contribute, share and research information about The Orange Lilies, and the Somme in SussmS196cRpZYwDpwRZ0xE8SSAex.

This project, whilst building on existing successful collaborative partnerships, differs in its’ focus from other Sussex World War I projects. It is a new discrete project from Strike a Light with young people and an intergenerational focus at its heart in terms of activities and outlook, finding creative ways to commemorate soldiers through the medium of film and textiles, created by young people (age 15-25), showing their creative heritage response to the events of the centenary in Brighton, presenting new, local interpretations of the Somme for this WWI centenary.

Commenting on the award, The Orange Lilies Project Coordinator Nicola Benge said: “We are thrilled to have received the support of the Heritage Lottery Fund and pleased we can at last research and remember soldiers from Brighton and Hove in Sussex Regiments who died so tragically at Boar’s Head and The Somme.”

 

For further information, images and interviews, please contact:

Nicola Benge, Project Manager – The Orange Lilies    
Strike a Light – Arts and Heritage
07727006538

theorangelilies@gmail.com

https://theorangelilies.wordpress.com/

@strikerlight

#orangelilies

 

Strike a Light funded to create new Breaking Bread project!

Breaking Bread

Strike a Light in partnership with creative producer Natasha Padbury is delighted to hear that we’ve just received funding from St Peters & North Laine Community First funders in Brighton.

This new project is due to start in January and run til May 2015 and is called….

Breaking Bread

Arise, and eat bread, and let thine heart be merry.—1 Kings xxi. 7

The loaf is at the heart of our lives. It’s our connection with sustenance, community and creativity. It is the unsung hero uniting us in more ways than just providing us with a basic meal. Since time immemorial it has formed the heart of our communities.

This unique project brings together North Laine and London Road’s past, present and future bread baking traditions to create a bespoke public collective memory, a means of expressing ourselves and enabling people to connect through the physical act of Breaking Bread together.

Breaking Bread will deliver-

  • 2 x Community Workshops for members of local organisations.
  • Heritage archive display of recipes and reminiscences of London Road baking provided by residents, bakers and businesses. Material to be made into virtual postcards and accessible viewing on the Strike a Light website.
  • London Road Open Market Bread Fayre:                              
  • With: Sharing of a large scale communal bread  * 2 x 40 minute free participatory workshops for the general public * Local Trader Contributions * Baking demonstrations

Breaking the Bread

The making of a large scale communal bread baked in a wood-fired mobile oven. To be broken and shared for free with visitors to the event. T his is an homage to the local literature cult classic The Giant Jam Sandwich, illustrated by John Vernon Lord (University of Brighton).

Loaf picture

Heritage

Archive display of recipes and reminiscences of London Road baking to be provided by residents, bakers and businesses, with pop-up display for notes and postcards. Members of the public will be invited to add to the collection.

Samples of collated and archival material to be made into virtual postcards for free and accessible viewing on the Strike a Light website.

Local heritage providers Queenspark Books through their Brighton and Hove Photographic Collection, Screen Archive South East and MyBrightonandHove have already agreed the non-copyright use of a variety of related London Road images from archives to support this event.

windmill

Objectives

Showing the objectives this project would meet and how:

  • Celebrates the local history of the London Road Open Market with an event in keeping with its original use
  • Promotes trade for North Laine and London Road businesses and organisations
  • Encourage local existing residents and new residents (through Hyde Housing Association and local universities) to engage with key aspects of London Road’s past, whilst learning new skills
  • Collect, record and create a unique archival product which can be promoted digitally and through a variety of media. Material will be used to further promote the Breaking Bread project, in turn promoting London Road as a cultural hub
  • Promotes cultural, social and creative activity in the area
  • Offering healthy eating/lifestyle promotion and creativity, by encouraging home baking and buying products from local suppliers
  • Invite public from outside the area to visit the area
  • Enhance community cohesion

Open Market

Business/organisation significance

 Strike a Light is a not-for-profit community arts and heritage organisation using people’s life stories and memories to engage a wide range of groups in creative and heritage activities, and making art to transform public and private spaces. Strike a Light believes in the idea of life skills and education through creativity, and aims to generate greater social inclusion by working with marginalised and vulnerable groups alongside all sections of the community.