Tag Archives: First World War

Researchers wanted for Shalom Sussex project!

If you’re interested in WWI history related to Judaism and Sussex, family history, local research, or working on creative and heritage projects, then get in touch!

We’d love to have you involved in our exciting new project starting in April 2019.

We’re currently seeking Volunteer Archive Researchers to support knowledge and history throughout this project. If you’re interested in getting involved then do get in touch. Training will be given.

Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage CIC, in partnership with the Centre for German-Jewish Studies, Jewish Care and the Jewish Historical Society of England is facilitating the project Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI.

The project will focus on the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

To mark the end of the Centenary of the First World War, between March 2019-March 2020, this project will enable people in Sussex to come together to preserve the memories and heritage of the Jewish people who lived locally during and post the First World War to collect these hidden histories.

Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant.

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/get-involved/

Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI will profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

Jewish people make up a small part of the Sussex demographic, and with partners and participants we have realised how little information is available about this topic. We seek to research, explore and share this hidden history. 

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

Through this year-long project we will explore local Jewish lives between 1914-1918, researching family experiences, traditions and religious memories. We will focus on investigating military service through archival publications such as the British Jewry Book of Honour to ensure stories aren’t lost for future generations, whilst seeking insight into Jewish life in Sussex at this key moment in history.

We will research turbulent events during this time: Internment, women in domestic and military life, military experiences and keeping kosher during this time of hardship.

We will highlight lives such as Florence Oppenheimer, who trained as a nurse (later a celebrated Jewish cook) at the Royal Sussex County Hospital in 1914, receiving a citation from Winston Churchill, Secretary of State for War, Capt. Joseph Friend of the Sussex Yeomanry, Leonard George Marks who served with the Royal Sussex Regiment and was killed in France, as well as children’s lives and school days too.

We seek to uncover and promote Jewish history related to World War I and share this with both Jewish and non-Jewish people to commemorate and celebrate this faith group and local lives.

The main focus of our project will be the creation of a community history website to collect new archive material, as well as to share this heritage publicly. In keeping with Jewish tradition, this site will enable visitors to respect ancestors so that their passing can be commemorated.

We will explore the Jewish Chronicle archive, Jewish Care archives, local conscription and hospital documents as well as synagogue records including those at Middle Street Synagogue, Brighton.

Over the next year, we will train volunteer researchers to find and collect new information, contextualising existing material to create a new community resource which will then be archived at The Keep, Brighton. Gateways to the First World War will support us to provide archival training specifically to develop this theme enabling volunteers to gain new skills.

We are organising a community history conference to offer a further engagement which the Jewish Historical Society of England will support. This will focus on themes such as – Internment in Sussex, Reprisals against Sussex based German and Austrian Jews, Jewish soldiers and nurses and conscientious objectors identifying as Jewish.

Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant. Follow our website to find out about events and activities between March 2019 and March 2020..

Our project partners are Jewish Care, Centre for German-Jewish Studies, and the Jewish Historical Society of England.

This project is funded by Heritage Lottery Fund through a First World War – Then and Now grant. Thanks to National Lottery players for their charitable support to help deliver this project.

We have also received funding from Jewish Care and the Sussex Record Society.

Shalom!

 

 

Shalom Sussex project starts

Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage is pleased to present a new project starting in March 2019 and running until March 2020. Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI will profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

Jewish people make up a small part of the Sussex demographic, and with partners and participants we have realised how little information is available about this topic. We seek to research, explore and share this hidden history. Visit our new project website to find out more: http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI will profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

Jewish people make up a small part of the Sussex demographic, and with partners and participants we have realised how little information is available about this topic. We seek to research, explore and share this hidden history. 

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

Through this year-long project we will explore local Jewish lives between 1914-1918, researching family experiences, traditions and religious memories. We will focus on investigating military service through archival publications such as the British Jewry Book of Honour to ensure stories aren’t lost for future generations, whilst seeking insight into Jewish life in Sussex at this key moment in history.

We will research turbulent events during this time: Internment, women in domestic and military life, military experiences and keeping kosher during this time of hardship.

We will highlight lives such as Florence Oppenheimer, who trained as a nurse (later a celebrated Jewish cook) at the Royal Sussex County Hospital in 1914, receiving a citation from Winston Churchill, Secretary of State for War, Capt. Joseph Friend of the Sussex Yeomanry, Leonard George Marks who served with the Royal Sussex Regiment and was killed in France, as well as children’s lives and school days too.

We seek to uncover and promote Jewish history related to World War I and share this with both Jewish and non-Jewish people to commemorate and celebrate this faith group and local lives.

The main focus of our project will be the creation of a community history website to collect new archive material, as well as to share this heritage publicly. In keeping with Jewish tradition, this site will enable visitors to respect ancestors so that their passing can be commemorated.

We will explore the Jewish Chronicle archive, Jewish Care archives, local conscription and hospital documents as well as synagogue records including those at Middle Street Synagogue, Brighton.

Over the next year, we will train volunteer researchers to find and collect new information, contextualising existing material to create a new community resource which will then be archived at The Keep, Brighton. Gateways to the First World War will support us to provide archival training specifically to develop this theme enabling volunteers to gain new skills.

We are organising a community history conference to offer a further engagement which the Jewish Historical Society of England will support. This will focus on themes such as – Internment in Sussex, Reprisals against Sussex based German and Austrian Jews, Jewish soldiers and nurses and conscientious objectors identifying as Jewish.

Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant. Follow our website to find out about events and activities between March 2019 and March 2020..

Our project partners are Jewish Care, Centre for German-Jewish Studies, and the Jewish Historical Society of England.

This project is funded by Heritage Lottery Fund through a First World War – Then and Now grant. Thanks to National Lottery players for their charitable support to help deliver this project.

We have also received funding from Jewish Care and the Sussex Record Society.

Shalom!

Strike a Light at Legacies of First World War Conference

Our creative director Nicola Benge will be speaking at the Legacies of the First World War Festival in Birmingham on 22nd and 23rd March 2019.
 
This two day community history conference is free to attend and has the noted historian David Olusoga as keynote speaker on the first day.
 
Come and experience some great histories and legacies of WWI.
You can book for any or all of the events including both conference days, and the evening event. Come join us!
 
Voices of War and Peace: the Great War and its Legacy is a First World War Engagement Centre funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council and in partnership with the Heritage Lottery Fund.
The University of Birmingham Centre is a joint initiative across the Midlands with Birmingham City University, University of Wolverhampton and University of Worcester, and further afield with Cardiff University, University of Durham, Manchester Metropolitan University and Newcastle University.
The Engagement Centre is based in the Library of Birmingham and supports a wide range of community engagement activities, connecting academic and public histories of the First World War as part of the commemoration of the War’s centenary.

The Unremembered – Labour Corps in Sussex in WWI lunchtime talk – Today!

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This talk is today!
Nicola Benge, Creative Director of Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage will give a free talk on the topic of Labour Corps (Service Personnel) in Sussex during WWI to commemorate this forgotten contribution during the Great War. More project information here

This is a lunchtime talk, so feel free to bring a packed lunch to munch on whilst the talk takes place. Coffee and tea will be available for donations.

Book your free place here
Monday 19th November 2-4pm – FREE
Who were the Labour Corps?:
The Labour Corps supplied the army with weapons and ammunition, food and fodder, water and fuel. They built and maintained roads and railways. They were essential to the war effort.

British and Allied Forces struggled to cope with the demand for manpower after the huge losses of men during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. From January 1917, manpower was drawn from the UK, China, India, South Africa, Egypt, Canada, the Caribbean and many other places within the British Empire.

Tens of thousands travelled thousands of miles to defend freedom and although they rarely saw service in the frontline, many died or were seriously injured. Today their contributions and sacrifice are all but forgotten. They are The Unremembered.

The aim is to raise the profile of the Labour Corps and share this learning with community groups.

Project Details:
We’re pleased to have been commissioned to become a hub in Brighton and Hove by the Big Ideas Company to develop activities with local community groups to explore the history of the Labour Corps – service personnel during World War I, and often forgotten in this part of history.

The Unremembered project background:
This project is about the Labour Corps – Service Personnel in the British Army who have been forgotten and aren’t often commemorated. The aim is to raise the profile of the Labour Corps and share this learning with community groups and draw this forgotten history into the light.

Image: Collection of John Sheen author of histories of the Northumberland Fusiliers and Durham Light Infantry.
 The Labour Corps supplied the army with weapons and ammunition, food and fodder, water and fuel. They built and maintained roads and railways. They were essential to the war effort.

British and Allied Forces struggled to cope with the demand for manpower after the huge losses of men during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. From January 1917, manpower was drawn from the UK, China, India, South Africa, Egypt, Canada, the Caribbean and many other places within the British Empire.

Tens of thousands travelled thousands of miles to defend freedom and although they rarely saw service in the frontline, many died or were seriously injured. Today their contributions and sacrifice are all but forgotten. They are The Unremembered.

The Unremembered – Labour Corps in Sussex in WWI lunchtime talk

unremembered-logo-blackv2-1.jpg
Nicola Benge, Creative Director of Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage will give a free talk on the topic of Labour Corps (Service Personnel) in Sussex during WWI to commemorate this forgotten contribution during the Great War. More project information here

This is a lunchtime talk, so feel free to bring a packed lunch to munch on whilst the talk takes place. Coffee and tea will be available for donations.

Book your free place here
Monday 19th November 2-4pm – FREE
Who were the Labour Corps?:
The Labour Corps supplied the army with weapons and ammunition, food and fodder, water and fuel. They built and maintained roads and railways. They were essential to the war effort.

British and Allied Forces struggled to cope with the demand for manpower after the huge losses of men during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. From January 1917, manpower was drawn from the UK, China, India, South Africa, Egypt, Canada, the Caribbean and many other places within the British Empire.

Tens of thousands travelled thousands of miles to defend freedom and although they rarely saw service in the frontline, many died or were seriously injured. Today their contributions and sacrifice are all but forgotten. They are The Unremembered.

The aim is to raise the profile of the Labour Corps and share this learning with community groups.

Project Details:
We’re pleased to have been commissioned to become a hub in Brighton and Hove by the Big Ideas Company to develop activities with local community groups to explore the history of the Labour Corps – service personnel during World War I, and often forgotten in this part of history.

The Unremembered project background:
This project is about the Labour Corps – Service Personnel in the British Army who have been forgotten and aren’t often commemorated. The aim is to raise the profile of the Labour Corps and share this learning with community groups and draw this forgotten history into the light.

Image: Collection of John Sheen author of histories of the Northumberland Fusiliers and Durham Light Infantry.

 The Labour Corps supplied the army with weapons and ammunition, food and fodder, water and fuel. They built and maintained roads and railways. They were essential to the war effort.

British and Allied Forces struggled to cope with the demand for manpower after the huge losses of men during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. From January 1917, manpower was drawn from the UK, China, India, South Africa, Egypt, Canada, the Caribbean and many other places within the British Empire.

Tens of thousands travelled thousands of miles to defend freedom and although they rarely saw service in the frontline, many died or were seriously injured. Today their contributions and sacrifice are all but forgotten. They are The Unremembered.

Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage to attend Armistice National Service of Thanksgiving at Westminster Abbey

The orange lilies website
Nicola Benge, Creative Director of Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage will attend The National Service of Thanksgiving at Westminster Abbey on 11 November 2018, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Armistice.
This will be on behalf of those from Brighton and Hove who took part in The Orange Lilies – Brighton & Hove in the Somme project about the Royal Sussex Regiment in 1916 through Strike a Light.

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Members of the Royal family, and religious and political leaders will be joined by members of the public who have contributed to the Centenary on a national, regional and local level.

Recognising the huge contribution the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) and its First World War projects have made to the Centenary, the Department for Digital, Media and Sport invited HLF to nominate people to attend the Service.

As a result over 300 people who have been involved with HLF funded First World War projects across the UK will be attending the Service on Sunday.

Our Centenary project was made possible by a grant of £10,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund, which distributes the heritage share of National Lottery funding, supporting a wide variety of projects across the UK. HLF has invested £97million in 2,200 First World War Centenary projects.

Trench Brothers concert – Wed 17th October, Brighton Dome

Trench Brothers

A new music theatre work commemorating in Brighton the contributions of ethnic minority soldiers during the First World War through music, theatre and puppetry.

Strike a Light has been part of the Trench Brothers project with HMDT Music and this great event is part of this on Wednesday 17th Oct at the Brighton Dome. There’s still tickets available here: https://brightondome.org/event/18306/trench_brothers/
Trench Brothers concert
Music: Julian Joseph and Richard Taylor

Libretto: Tertia Sefton-Green
Trench Brothers is a new music theatre work commemorating in Brighton the contributions of ethnic minority soldiers during the First World War through music, theatre and puppetry, bringing to life their hopes and fears, their longing for home, their camaraderie, courage and valour.
Directed by Clare Whistler and Freya Wynn-Jones to Neil Irish’s designs, it features over 250 children from local primary schools in Brighton, Newhaven, Lewes and Seaford alongside acclaimed jazz vocalist of the year and MOBO nominated Cleveland Watkiss and ‘superb’ (The Times) opera singer Damian Thantrey.
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Renowned jazz composer Julian Joseph and award-winning composer Richard Taylor are joined by composers Michael Betteridge, Jenny Gould, Matthew King, James Redwood and Omar Shahryar in a unique collaboration drawing together work developed with schools across London, Lancashire and the South East since 2014.This powerful centenary event is made all the more poignant by its location in Brighton Dome, which served as an Indian Military Hospital during the war.

There will be a pre-performance talk about the creation of Trench Brothers with Julian Joseph, Richard Taylor and Tertia Sefton-Green. Tickets to the evening performance also give access to the pre-performance talk.

http://www.hmdt.org.uk/hmdtmusic/trenchbrothers/performance/

HMDT
Trench Brothers project in partnership with Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage

The Unremembered – Project dates for Brighton

Project Details:
We’re pleased to have been commissioned to become a hub in Brighton and Hove by the Big Ideas Company to develop activities with local community groups to explore the history of the Labour Corps – service personnel during World War I, and often forgotten in this part of history.

Events:

Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage will deliver workshops in October and November 2018 (We will confirm dates very soon) in Brighton and Hove with ten different groups in ten different venues across the city to look at the theme of The Unremembered. We aim to commemorate the Labour Corps service personnel and their experiences.

Free drop in families puppet making sessions (at following venues and times):

  • Monday 29th October – 1.45-4.15pm: ONCA at The Barge, The Waterfront, Brighton BN2 5UU
  • Thursday 1st November – 12-3pm: Brighton Open Market, Marshalls Row, Brighton BN1 4JU
  • Saturday 24th November – 12-5pm: Black History Day at The Dome, Brighton.
  • Sunday 25th November – 11-1pm: Jubilee Library, Jubilee Square, Brighton.

and

Monday 19th November 2-3pm: Talk on Labour Corps and Sussex at Strike a Light, Brighton Open Market, Studio 8 (Mezzanine), Marshalls Row, Brighton BN1 4JU.

*** More dates tbc ***


The Unremembered project background:
This project is about the Labour Corps – Service Personnel in the British Army who have essentially been pretty forgotten and aren’t really commemorated anywhere. The aim is to raise the profile of the Labour Corps and share this learning with community groups.
Who were the Labour Corps?

 
 
 
 
 
 
Image: Collection of John Sheen author of histories of the Northumberland Fusiliers and Durham Light Infantry.
 The Labour Corps supplied the army with weapons and ammunition, food and fodder, water and fuel. They built and maintained roads and railways. They were essential to the war effort.
British and Allied Forces struggled to cope with the demand for manpower after the huge losses of men during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. From January 1917, manpower was drawn from the UK, China, India, South Africa, Egypt, Canada, the Caribbean and many other places within the British Empire.
Tens of thousands travelled thousands of miles to defend freedom and although they rarely saw service in the frontline, many died or were seriously injured. Today their contributions and sacrifice are all but forgotten. They are The Unremembered.
Events:
We are working engaging with freelancers and volunteers to deliver a series of history and resource led activities which focus on the art of making articulated paper puppets (a common past time a centenary ago) with community groups and families.
These puppets are a mixture of pre-printed on cardboard outline templates which can then be designed, created and compiled by participants and for those with dexterity issues or the very young, pre-designed printed templates which can be assembled with support and displayed.  We will use fabric scraps, wrapping paper and wall paper to create overlaid uniforms for these puppets and to bring them to life.
We will also create activities to create dressing paper dolls, so creating the one dimensional paper dolls through templates which are cut out and then one dimensional clothing made relevant to our theme which can then be folded over the puppet body. These dolls were popular during WWI and were still printed then despite paper shortages.
Both these forms of puppet making are ideal for classroom and community projects because they are made with everyday craft supplies and reused materials.
The puppet theme for this project is two-fold – one that it is an engaging and accessible way to teach young people and community groups who are unaware of this lost period of history about the Labour Corps, and secondly that the puppets can be seen as a metaphor for the role of the Labour Corps in terms of having no control over their work or location, that they were moved around like mules and essentially treated as such too. This will be a way to valorise those men and celebrate their role.
This will help to remember some of the soldiers who served with the Labour Corps and their link with Sussex and draw this forgotten history into the light.

https://strikealight.org/projects/the-unremembered-project/

 

Trench Brothers project starts!

We’ve just been engaged to work on this lovely project ‘Trench Brothers’ in Sussex for HMDT Music.
 
Trench Brothers brings the First World War to life for students through the experiences and personal stories of Indian Army, British West Indies Regiment and black British Soldiers. It commemorates their contributions using puppetry, music, artefacts and cross-curricular learning and culminates in performances of a new music theatre work by composers Julian Joseph and Richard Taylor and librettist Tertia Sefton-Green, enabling students to develop a creative, artistic response to the stories and immortalise the deeds of these forgotten soldiers.
 
We will be delivering free training in archives and research with volunteers in the area, alongside visits to Seaford Museum, The Keep and the Chattri. This will lead to an exhibition this summer at Newhaven Fort.
 
We’ll be sending out more information soon about how to get involved!
 

Issac Rayner – Portslade to Peronne


The Orange Lilies project managed by Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage aims to highlight the city’s experience of living through The Somme. Through the project, we are gathering and contextualising material and information for city residents, school teachers, researchers and those interested in WWI.
It comprise interviews, newspaper reports & other printed items, photographs, objects and documents held at public libraries, museums and the The Keep archive. Part of the project entails finding relatives and family members with photos and memories of people from the city who served during the Somme, or lived in Brighton and Hove at the time of the batyle between 30th June 1916 and 18th November 1916.
June is a lovely Hove based lady in her early 90s involved with an older people’s group called Memories Past, who married into the Rayner family in the 1940s. Meeting June Rayner not so long ago, we got talking about her husband who was in Burma in World War II, and then his father a Portslade born man called Issac Rayner who served in the Battle of the Somme in 1916 with the Royal Sussex Regiment.
img_3799Issac was born in the 1890s and lived in 35 South Street, Portslade village, part of Brighton and Hove in a house that no longer exists. The photo (to the left and right), whilst not dated, was taken in Portland Road (the road joining Portslade to Hove) by H.W Tubb, a well known photographer at the time with an established business in the area.
Henry William Tubb’s home in Portland Road also served as his studio and business premises. Henry Tubb was keen to point out in his advertisements that his Portland Road Studio was located opposite Portslade Railway Station.
Henry Tubb set up a photographic studio in Portland Road, Hove, around 1899. Describing himself as an “Artist Photographer”, Henry Tubb took studio portraits at his Portland Road Studio, but he was also an “outdoor photographer”, offering to bring his camera along  to “Garden Parties, Wedding groups, etc., ..by appointment”. Henry Tubb was also keen to advertise his expertise in making photographic enlargements.
Tubb’s advertisements proclaimed “Photographs in all Styles – Enlargements of all Description” and the publicity on the reverse of his cabinet and carte-de-visite portraits, under the heading “ENLARGEMENTS TO ALL STYLES”, assured his customers that “the negative of this photograph is preserved from which enlargements or further copies can always be obtained.”  To supplement his photography business, Henry Tubb also made picture frames at his Portland Road premises. (Taken from http://www.photohistory-sussex.co.uk).
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Issacissac-rayner-with-moustache-wwi (also known as Ike) joined up with the Royal Sussex Regiment at a date unknown during the Somme and became a machine  gunner in the trenches there.  He suffered inordinately in this time and was buried alive whilst tunnelling, being rescued by army colleagues digging him out. Once recovered from this ordeal, he was sent back to the front, where he was then gassed.
From the British Legion website ‘the Battle of the Somme also saw several different weapons being used including mines, poisonous gas and machine guns. Some of the larger machine guns needed 12 men to operate them. The best known innovation of 1916 was the tank, first used in battle at Flers on 15 September 1916. Armoured, tracked vehicles were designed to cross trenches, crush barbed wire and give direct fire support’.
Issac Rayner remained in the army until at least the end of 1919. We can’t be sure, but from the photos seen of him in colonial army wear, posed with other Royal Sussex Regimental soldiers also in shorts, and another portrait shot of Issac with a pith helmet, it seems possible that he was part of a Battalion transferred to India in 1917. Pith Helmets were widely used by the British Army in the Middle East, India and Africa to protect delicate British complexions from the fierce sun.
issac-in-india
In this postcard sent home to his parents, dated 1st August 1919, Issac is pictured second row from the top, third from the left, clearly identified by his large moustache, something he hadn’t had before enlisting or later when he returned home.
The back of the card reads ‘To mother and Dad, from your affectionate and loving son. I.Rayner xxx Sent to Mrs Rayner, 35 South Street, Portslade, Sussex , England
issac-rayner-3rd-from-left-3rd-row-up-with-moustache
 
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We don’t know anything further of his time with the Royal Sussex Regiment, only that he did survive the war and his injuries. Many soldiers who survived being gassed in the tranches died very young, so Ike was fortunate in this aspect.
6-crown-road-issac-raynerflorence-jane-packer-married-to-issac-rayner-6-crown-rd-garden-portsladeReturning to Portslade, Issac met and married Florence Jane Packer in the early 1920s who at the time lived at 6 Crown Road (see right), Portslade, pictured here in the back garden of the house at a date unknown.
It isn’t known if they knew each other before the war, however Florence was also from a local Portslade family and had grown up in the house in Crown Road along with her parents (see right – Great Grandad Packer) and siblings. florence-packers-father-issacs-fil
Returning to Portslade, Issac lived until 77,  dying at the home inherited by him and Florence from the Packer side of the family at Crown Road, Portslade on  14th November 1962.
Florence it is believed was a strict woman, who wasn’t given to smiling too often. She did lose two of her young nephews (Michael and Donald Packer) in WWII. Both sailors, as were many in the Packer family during the second world war. The two men were on separate naval ships which were torpedoed by German boats, so this may be connected. She died much before her husband Issac but it is unsure when.
Issac and Florence had two sons, Cyril born in 1922, followed by the younger son Dennis, who was born on 6th of September 1926, and a (possibly illegitimate) niece brought up as a daughter of the Rayner family, named Iris.
The photograph below was taken by Stacy Ward, a portrait photographer who took over the business and premises from HW Tubb (and premises moved to 39 Station Road) who earlier took Issac Rayner’s photo in the mid 1900s.
issacs-daughter-iris-husband-keith-and-child-1942-taken-in-portslade
issacs-daughter-and-family-1942-portslade
The children all married local Portslade people. Issac and Florence lived in the house at Crown Road (near Fishersgate) until the 1960s.
Dennis was posted to India during World War II age only 19. Below is a snap of him as a private in Poona (now Pune) south of Mumbai, India.
dennis-rayner-age-19-poona-india-1945
dennis-rayner-and-friend-1940s
dennis-rayner-back-of-photo
June met and married Dennis Rayner (Issac’s younger son) in the 1940s and they had four sons who all still live in the area. Here she is as a young girl with toy pram, and later, aged around 15 in a portrait photographic shot around the time of meeting Dennis Rayner.
june-rayner-dennis-wife-as-a-girl
june-rayner-denniss-wife-portslade-age-15
June and Dennis were married a long time until Dennis sadly passed away.
denniss-retirement-party
Here you can see Dennis with two friends at his retirement party in 1991.