Tag Archives: First World War

Shalom Sussex project website

 

Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage has set up a new project website to support the Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI to profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

Jewish people make up a small part of the Sussex demographic, and with partners and participants we have realised how little information is available about this topic. We seek to research, explore and share this hidden history.

Visit this website to find out more: http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI will profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

Jewish people make up a small part of the Sussex demographic, and with partners and participants we have realised how little information is available about this topic. We seek to research, explore and share this hidden history. 

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

 

 

Freelance role – Volunteer Research Coordinator: Shalom Sussex project deadline today

Today is the final day to apply for the role of freelance Volunteer Research Coordinator to support the development of our Shalom Sussex – Jewish People in Sussex project with Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage.
 
Volunteer Research Coordinator
Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI project
 
Freelance position 10 days (80 hours ) 30th April – 30th December 2019
 
Total Fee: £1400
 
Job Description
Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage CIC is based in Sussex and works with people’s life stories and memories to engage a wide range of groups in creative and heritage activities, making art to transform public and private spaces.
 
Project information:
The Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI Project will profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.
 
It will work in partnership with the Centre for German-Jewish Studies, Jewish Historical Society of England and Jewish Lewes District Council, and support from Gateways to the First World War.
 
The project will be developed through the engagement of new audiences will be through training, archival research, community heritage events, visits, workshops using archive material, reminiscence sessions, a bespoke website, postcards and case studies.
 
This role is for a Volunteer Research Coordinator who will engage with and support our project volunteers to develop their research during the life of the project, and to collate and file this research into usable formats which can then be easily formed into an exhibition by the Project Manager.
 
This work will be done through volunteer archival visits, email contact with volunteers, liaison with the Shalom Sussex Project Manager and compiling folders using Google Drive to enable easy access to relevant research and findings.
 
Key Responsibilities
 
1. To engage, coordinate, plan, train, support and execute the heritage research side of the Shalom Sussex- Jewish People in WWI project over an eight month period (80 hours).
2. To manage this time in a responsible and relevant manner between 30th April 2019 and 30th December 2019.
3. Making visits with project volunteers to The Keep archive, Hastings Library and other venues in Sussex including West Sussex Record Office to support the gathering of information which will serve to inform a series of events for the project
4. To gather research and archive this in a usable format through a series of clearly labelled Google Drives which volunteers can upload their findings to and which the Project Manager can access.
5. Ensure clear labelling of all research and images for use and to ensure copyright can be traced
6. Maintain regular email discussion with volunteer researchers about the project and its research an findings
7. Through the uncovering of information, to create useable information which the Shalom Sussex Project Manager can then use to develop the project website, feed into a series of downloadable resources and help inform a community history conference in January 2020.
8. To write two event reviews in The Shalom Sussex project blog.
9. Keep a clear time log of hours worked
10. Comply with relevant legislation and best practice, ensuring that good working practices are employed at all times, particularly in interactions with vulnerable adults and in compliance with health and safety policies and procedures.
 
Person Specification
The Volunteer Research Coordinator will have the following skills:
 
• Extensive knowledge and understanding of the heritage sector.
• Research and methodology experience
• Knowledge and experience of working with volunteers
• Experience of working on and engaging with local and national archives
• Experience of working on funded projects
• Knowledge and experience of volunteer management
• Compilation of research into relevant formats for use in exhibition and digital outputs
• Excellent written and communication skills
• Comprehensive IT skills
 
Desirable but not essential
• Understanding of Jewish History
 
To apply:
Submit CV and covering letter responding to the person specification by 21st April 2019 (midnight).
 
Those shortlisted must be available for informal meetings on 23rd or 24th April 2019 with a view to the successful candidate starting on 30th April.
 
Contact:
For a copy of the brief, please contact Project Manager, Nicola Benge – Strikealight@rocketmail.com
 
http://shalomsussex.co.uk/
 

Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI will profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

Jewish people make up a small part of the Sussex demographic, and with partners and participants we have realised how little information is available about this topic. We seek to research, explore and share this hidden history. 

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

Through this year-long project we will explore local Jewish lives between 1914-1918, researching family experiences, traditions and religious memories. We will focus on investigating military service through archival publications such as the British Jewry Book of Honour to ensure stories aren’t lost for future generations, whilst seeking insight into Jewish life in Sussex at this key moment in history.

We will research turbulent events during this time: Internment, women in domestic and military life, military experiences and keeping kosher during this time of hardship.

We will highlight lives such as Florence Oppenheimer, who trained as a nurse (later a celebrated Jewish cook) at the Royal Sussex County Hospital in 1914, receiving a citation from Winston Churchill, Secretary of State for War, Capt. Joseph Friend of the Sussex Yeomanry, Leonard George Marks who served with the Royal Sussex Regiment and was killed in France, as well as children’s lives and school days too.

We seek to uncover and promote Jewish history related to World War I and share this with both Jewish and non-Jewish people to commemorate and celebrate this faith group and local lives.

The main focus of our project will be the creation of a community history website to collect new archive material, as well as to share this heritage publicly. In keeping with Jewish tradition, this site will enable visitors to respect ancestors so that their passing can be commemorated.

We will explore the Jewish Chronicle archive, Jewish Care archives, local conscription and hospital documents as well as synagogue records including those at Middle Street Synagogue, Brighton.

Over the next year, we will train volunteer researchers to find and collect new information, contextualising existing material to create a new community resource which will then be archived at The Keep, Brighton. Gateways to the First World War will support us to provide archival training specifically to develop this theme enabling volunteers to gain new skills.

We are organising a community history conference to offer a further engagement which the Jewish Historical Society of England will support. This will focus on themes such as – Internment in Sussex, Reprisals against Sussex based German and Austrian Jews, Jewish soldiers and nurses and conscientious objectors identifying as Jewish.

Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant. Follow our website to find out about events and activities between March 2019 and March 2020..

Our project partners are Jewish Care, Centre for German-Jewish Studies, and the Jewish Historical Society of England.

This project is funded by Heritage Lottery Fund through a First World War – Then and Now grant. Thanks to National Lottery players for their charitable support to help deliver this project.

We have also received funding from Jewish Care and the Sussex Record Society.

Shalom!

 

 

Researchers wanted for Shalom Sussex project!

If you’re interested in WWI history related to Judaism and Sussex, family history, local research, or working on creative and heritage projects, then get in touch!

We’d love to have you involved in our exciting new project starting in April 2019.

We’re currently seeking Volunteer Archive Researchers to support knowledge and history throughout this project. If you’re interested in getting involved then do get in touch. Training will be given.

Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage CIC, in partnership with the Centre for German-Jewish Studies, Jewish Care and the Jewish Historical Society of England is facilitating the project Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI.

The project will focus on the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

To mark the end of the Centenary of the First World War, between March 2019-March 2020, this project will enable people in Sussex to come together to preserve the memories and heritage of the Jewish people who lived locally during and post the First World War to collect these hidden histories.

Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant.

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/get-involved/

Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI will profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

Jewish people make up a small part of the Sussex demographic, and with partners and participants we have realised how little information is available about this topic. We seek to research, explore and share this hidden history. 

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

Through this year-long project we will explore local Jewish lives between 1914-1918, researching family experiences, traditions and religious memories. We will focus on investigating military service through archival publications such as the British Jewry Book of Honour to ensure stories aren’t lost for future generations, whilst seeking insight into Jewish life in Sussex at this key moment in history.

We will research turbulent events during this time: Internment, women in domestic and military life, military experiences and keeping kosher during this time of hardship.

We will highlight lives such as Florence Oppenheimer, who trained as a nurse (later a celebrated Jewish cook) at the Royal Sussex County Hospital in 1914, receiving a citation from Winston Churchill, Secretary of State for War, Capt. Joseph Friend of the Sussex Yeomanry, Leonard George Marks who served with the Royal Sussex Regiment and was killed in France, as well as children’s lives and school days too.

We seek to uncover and promote Jewish history related to World War I and share this with both Jewish and non-Jewish people to commemorate and celebrate this faith group and local lives.

The main focus of our project will be the creation of a community history website to collect new archive material, as well as to share this heritage publicly. In keeping with Jewish tradition, this site will enable visitors to respect ancestors so that their passing can be commemorated.

We will explore the Jewish Chronicle archive, Jewish Care archives, local conscription and hospital documents as well as synagogue records including those at Middle Street Synagogue, Brighton.

Over the next year, we will train volunteer researchers to find and collect new information, contextualising existing material to create a new community resource which will then be archived at The Keep, Brighton. Gateways to the First World War will support us to provide archival training specifically to develop this theme enabling volunteers to gain new skills.

We are organising a community history conference to offer a further engagement which the Jewish Historical Society of England will support. This will focus on themes such as – Internment in Sussex, Reprisals against Sussex based German and Austrian Jews, Jewish soldiers and nurses and conscientious objectors identifying as Jewish.

Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant. Follow our website to find out about events and activities between March 2019 and March 2020..

Our project partners are Jewish Care, Centre for German-Jewish Studies, and the Jewish Historical Society of England.

This project is funded by Heritage Lottery Fund through a First World War – Then and Now grant. Thanks to National Lottery players for their charitable support to help deliver this project.

We have also received funding from Jewish Care and the Sussex Record Society.

Shalom!

 

 

Freelance role – Volunteer Research Coordinator: Shalom Sussex project

Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage is seeking a freelance Volunteer Research Coordinator to support the development of our Shalom Sussex – Jewish People in Sussex project.
 
Volunteer Research Coordinator
Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI project
 
Freelance position 10 days (80 hours ) 30th April – 30th December 2019
 
Total Fee: £1400
 
Job Description
Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage CIC is based in Sussex and works with people’s life stories and memories to engage a wide range of groups in creative and heritage activities, making art to transform public and private spaces.
 
Project information:
The Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI Project will profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.
 
It will work in partnership with the Centre for German-Jewish Studies, Jewish Historical Society of England and Jewish Lewes District Council, and support from Gateways to the First World War.
 
The project will be developed through the engagement of new audiences will be through training, archival research, community heritage events, visits, workshops using archive material, reminiscence sessions, a bespoke website, postcards and case studies.
 
This role is for a Volunteer Research Coordinator who will engage with and support our project volunteers to develop their research during the life of the project, and to collate and file this research into usable formats which can then be easily formed into an exhibition by the Project Manager.
 
This work will be done through volunteer archival visits, email contact with volunteers, liaison with the Shalom Sussex Project Manager and compiling folders using Google Drive to enable easy access to relevant research and findings.
 
Key Responsibilities
 
1. To engage, coordinate, plan, train, support and execute the heritage research side of the Shalom Sussex- Jewish People in WWI project over an eight month period (80 hours).
2. To manage this time in a responsible and relevant manner between 30th April 2019 and 30th December 2019.
3. Making visits with project volunteers to The Keep archive, Hastings Library and other venues in Sussex including West Sussex Record Office to support the gathering of information which will serve to inform a series of events for the project
4. To gather research and archive this in a usable format through a series of clearly labelled Google Drives which volunteers can upload their findings to and which the Project Manager can access.
5. Ensure clear labelling of all research and images for use and to ensure copyright can be traced
6. Maintain regular email discussion with volunteer researchers about the project and its research an findings
7. Through the uncovering of information, to create useable information which the Shalom Sussex Project Manager can then use to develop the project website, feed into a series of downloadable resources and help inform a community history conference in January 2020.
8. To write two event reviews in The Shalom Sussex project blog.
9. Keep a clear time log of hours worked
10. Comply with relevant legislation and best practice, ensuring that good working practices are employed at all times, particularly in interactions with vulnerable adults and in compliance with health and safety policies and procedures.
 
Person Specification
The Volunteer Research Coordinator will have the following skills:
 
• Extensive knowledge and understanding of the heritage sector.
• Research and methodology experience
• Knowledge and experience of working with volunteers
• Experience of working on and engaging with local and national archives
• Experience of working on funded projects
• Knowledge and experience of volunteer management
• Compilation of research into relevant formats for use in exhibition and digital outputs
• Excellent written and communication skills
• Comprehensive IT skills
 
Desirable but not essential
• Understanding of Jewish History
 
To apply:
Submit CV and covering letter responding to the person specification by 21st April 2019 (midnight).
 
Those shortlisted must be available for informal meetings on 23rd or 24th April 2019 with a view to the successful candidate starting on 30th April.
 
Contact:
For a copy of the brief, please contact Project Manager, Nicola Benge – Strikealight@rocketmail.com
 
http://shalomsussex.co.uk/
 

Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI will profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

Jewish people make up a small part of the Sussex demographic, and with partners and participants we have realised how little information is available about this topic. We seek to research, explore and share this hidden history. 

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

Through this year-long project we will explore local Jewish lives between 1914-1918, researching family experiences, traditions and religious memories. We will focus on investigating military service through archival publications such as the British Jewry Book of Honour to ensure stories aren’t lost for future generations, whilst seeking insight into Jewish life in Sussex at this key moment in history.

We will research turbulent events during this time: Internment, women in domestic and military life, military experiences and keeping kosher during this time of hardship.

We will highlight lives such as Florence Oppenheimer, who trained as a nurse (later a celebrated Jewish cook) at the Royal Sussex County Hospital in 1914, receiving a citation from Winston Churchill, Secretary of State for War, Capt. Joseph Friend of the Sussex Yeomanry, Leonard George Marks who served with the Royal Sussex Regiment and was killed in France, as well as children’s lives and school days too.

We seek to uncover and promote Jewish history related to World War I and share this with both Jewish and non-Jewish people to commemorate and celebrate this faith group and local lives.

The main focus of our project will be the creation of a community history website to collect new archive material, as well as to share this heritage publicly. In keeping with Jewish tradition, this site will enable visitors to respect ancestors so that their passing can be commemorated.

We will explore the Jewish Chronicle archive, Jewish Care archives, local conscription and hospital documents as well as synagogue records including those at Middle Street Synagogue, Brighton.

Over the next year, we will train volunteer researchers to find and collect new information, contextualising existing material to create a new community resource which will then be archived at The Keep, Brighton. Gateways to the First World War will support us to provide archival training specifically to develop this theme enabling volunteers to gain new skills.

We are organising a community history conference to offer a further engagement which the Jewish Historical Society of England will support. This will focus on themes such as – Internment in Sussex, Reprisals against Sussex based German and Austrian Jews, Jewish soldiers and nurses and conscientious objectors identifying as Jewish.

Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant. Follow our website to find out about events and activities between March 2019 and March 2020..

Our project partners are Jewish Care, Centre for German-Jewish Studies, and the Jewish Historical Society of England.

This project is funded by Heritage Lottery Fund through a First World War – Then and Now grant. Thanks to National Lottery players for their charitable support to help deliver this project.

We have also received funding from Jewish Care and the Sussex Record Society.

Shalom!

 

 

Researchers wanted for Shalom Sussex project!

If you’re interested in WWI history related to Judaism and Sussex, family history, local research, or working on creative and heritage projects, then get in touch!

We’d love to have you involved in our exciting new project starting in April 2019.  Our first meeting takes place on 24th April 10-12pm at the Strike a Light studio in Brighton.

We’re currently seeking Volunteer Archive Researchers to support knowledge and history throughout this project. If you’re interested in getting involved then do get in touch. Training will be given.

Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage CIC, in partnership with the Centre for German-Jewish Studies, Jewish Care and the Jewish Historical Society of England is facilitating the project Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI.

The project will focus on the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

To mark the end of the Centenary of the First World War, between March 2019-March 2020, this project will enable people in Sussex to come together to preserve the memories and heritage of the Jewish people who lived locally during and post the First World War to collect these hidden histories.

Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant.

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/get-involved/

Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI will profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

Jewish people make up a small part of the Sussex demographic, and with partners and participants we have realised how little information is available about this topic. We seek to research, explore and share this hidden history. 

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

Through this year-long project we will explore local Jewish lives between 1914-1918, researching family experiences, traditions and religious memories. We will focus on investigating military service through archival publications such as the British Jewry Book of Honour to ensure stories aren’t lost for future generations, whilst seeking insight into Jewish life in Sussex at this key moment in history.

We will research turbulent events during this time: Internment, women in domestic and military life, military experiences and keeping kosher during this time of hardship.

We will highlight lives such as Florence Oppenheimer, who trained as a nurse (later a celebrated Jewish cook) at the Royal Sussex County Hospital in 1914, receiving a citation from Winston Churchill, Secretary of State for War, Capt. Joseph Friend of the Sussex Yeomanry, Leonard George Marks who served with the Royal Sussex Regiment and was killed in France, as well as children’s lives and school days too.

We seek to uncover and promote Jewish history related to World War I and share this with both Jewish and non-Jewish people to commemorate and celebrate this faith group and local lives.

The main focus of our project will be the creation of a community history website to collect new archive material, as well as to share this heritage publicly. In keeping with Jewish tradition, this site will enable visitors to respect ancestors so that their passing can be commemorated.

We will explore the Jewish Chronicle archive, Jewish Care archives, local conscription and hospital documents as well as synagogue records including those at Middle Street Synagogue, Brighton.

Over the next year, we will train volunteer researchers to find and collect new information, contextualising existing material to create a new community resource which will then be archived at The Keep, Brighton. Gateways to the First World War will support us to provide archival training specifically to develop this theme enabling volunteers to gain new skills.

We are organising a community history conference to offer a further engagement which the Jewish Historical Society of England will support. This will focus on themes such as – Internment in Sussex, Reprisals against Sussex based German and Austrian Jews, Jewish soldiers and nurses and conscientious objectors identifying as Jewish.

Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant. Follow our website to find out about events and activities between March 2019 and March 2020..

Our project partners are Jewish Care, Centre for German-Jewish Studies, and the Jewish Historical Society of England.

This project is funded by Heritage Lottery Fund through a First World War – Then and Now grant. Thanks to National Lottery players for their charitable support to help deliver this project.

We have also received funding from Jewish Care and the Sussex Record Society.

Shalom!

 

 

Strike a Light at Legacies of First World War Conference – This weekend

Our creative director Nicola Benge is pleased to be speaking at the Legacies of the First World War Festival in Birmingham this weekend.
She will be looking at some of the projects Strike a Light have worked on over the past four years with a special focus on those which explore the black and minority ethnic contributions to the war. 
These projects include Dr Blighty, Trench Brothers and The Unremembered.
 
This two day community history conference is free to attend and has the noted historian David Olusoga as keynote speaker on the first day.
 
Come and experience some great histories and legacies of WWI.
You can book for any or all of the events including both conference days, and the evening event. Come join us!
 
Voices of War and Peace: the Great War and its Legacy is a First World War Engagement Centre funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council and in partnership with the Heritage Lottery Fund.
The University of Birmingham Centre is a joint initiative across the Midlands with Birmingham City University, University of Wolverhampton and University of Worcester, and further afield with Cardiff University, University of Durham, Manchester Metropolitan University and Newcastle University.
The Engagement Centre is based in the Library of Birmingham and supports a wide range of community engagement activities, connecting academic and public histories of the First World War as part of the commemoration of the War’s centenary.

Researchers wanted for Shalom Sussex project!

If you’re interested in WWI history related to Judaism and Sussex, family history, local research, or working on creative and heritage projects, then get in touch!

We’d love to have you involved in our exciting new project starting in April 2019.

We’re currently seeking Volunteer Archive Researchers to support knowledge and history throughout this project. If you’re interested in getting involved then do get in touch. Training will be given.

Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage CIC, in partnership with the Centre for German-Jewish Studies, Jewish Care and the Jewish Historical Society of England is facilitating the project Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI.

The project will focus on the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

To mark the end of the Centenary of the First World War, between March 2019-March 2020, this project will enable people in Sussex to come together to preserve the memories and heritage of the Jewish people who lived locally during and post the First World War to collect these hidden histories.

Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant.

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/get-involved/

Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI will profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

Jewish people make up a small part of the Sussex demographic, and with partners and participants we have realised how little information is available about this topic. We seek to research, explore and share this hidden history. 

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

Through this year-long project we will explore local Jewish lives between 1914-1918, researching family experiences, traditions and religious memories. We will focus on investigating military service through archival publications such as the British Jewry Book of Honour to ensure stories aren’t lost for future generations, whilst seeking insight into Jewish life in Sussex at this key moment in history.

We will research turbulent events during this time: Internment, women in domestic and military life, military experiences and keeping kosher during this time of hardship.

We will highlight lives such as Florence Oppenheimer, who trained as a nurse (later a celebrated Jewish cook) at the Royal Sussex County Hospital in 1914, receiving a citation from Winston Churchill, Secretary of State for War, Capt. Joseph Friend of the Sussex Yeomanry, Leonard George Marks who served with the Royal Sussex Regiment and was killed in France, as well as children’s lives and school days too.

We seek to uncover and promote Jewish history related to World War I and share this with both Jewish and non-Jewish people to commemorate and celebrate this faith group and local lives.

The main focus of our project will be the creation of a community history website to collect new archive material, as well as to share this heritage publicly. In keeping with Jewish tradition, this site will enable visitors to respect ancestors so that their passing can be commemorated.

We will explore the Jewish Chronicle archive, Jewish Care archives, local conscription and hospital documents as well as synagogue records including those at Middle Street Synagogue, Brighton.

Over the next year, we will train volunteer researchers to find and collect new information, contextualising existing material to create a new community resource which will then be archived at The Keep, Brighton. Gateways to the First World War will support us to provide archival training specifically to develop this theme enabling volunteers to gain new skills.

We are organising a community history conference to offer a further engagement which the Jewish Historical Society of England will support. This will focus on themes such as – Internment in Sussex, Reprisals against Sussex based German and Austrian Jews, Jewish soldiers and nurses and conscientious objectors identifying as Jewish.

Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant. Follow our website to find out about events and activities between March 2019 and March 2020..

Our project partners are Jewish Care, Centre for German-Jewish Studies, and the Jewish Historical Society of England.

This project is funded by Heritage Lottery Fund through a First World War – Then and Now grant. Thanks to National Lottery players for their charitable support to help deliver this project.

We have also received funding from Jewish Care and the Sussex Record Society.

Shalom!

 

 

Shalom Sussex project starts

Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage is pleased to present a new project starting in March 2019 and running until March 2020. Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI will profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

Jewish people make up a small part of the Sussex demographic, and with partners and participants we have realised how little information is available about this topic. We seek to research, explore and share this hidden history. Visit our new project website to find out more: http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

Shalom Sussex – The Jewish Community in WWI will profile the contribution Jewish people in Sussex made during the First World War – both on the home-front and abroad on the battlefield.

Jewish people make up a small part of the Sussex demographic, and with partners and participants we have realised how little information is available about this topic. We seek to research, explore and share this hidden history. 

http://shalomsussex.co.uk/

Through this year-long project we will explore local Jewish lives between 1914-1918, researching family experiences, traditions and religious memories. We will focus on investigating military service through archival publications such as the British Jewry Book of Honour to ensure stories aren’t lost for future generations, whilst seeking insight into Jewish life in Sussex at this key moment in history.

We will research turbulent events during this time: Internment, women in domestic and military life, military experiences and keeping kosher during this time of hardship.

We will highlight lives such as Florence Oppenheimer, who trained as a nurse (later a celebrated Jewish cook) at the Royal Sussex County Hospital in 1914, receiving a citation from Winston Churchill, Secretary of State for War, Capt. Joseph Friend of the Sussex Yeomanry, Leonard George Marks who served with the Royal Sussex Regiment and was killed in France, as well as children’s lives and school days too.

We seek to uncover and promote Jewish history related to World War I and share this with both Jewish and non-Jewish people to commemorate and celebrate this faith group and local lives.

The main focus of our project will be the creation of a community history website to collect new archive material, as well as to share this heritage publicly. In keeping with Jewish tradition, this site will enable visitors to respect ancestors so that their passing can be commemorated.

We will explore the Jewish Chronicle archive, Jewish Care archives, local conscription and hospital documents as well as synagogue records including those at Middle Street Synagogue, Brighton.

Over the next year, we will train volunteer researchers to find and collect new information, contextualising existing material to create a new community resource which will then be archived at The Keep, Brighton. Gateways to the First World War will support us to provide archival training specifically to develop this theme enabling volunteers to gain new skills.

We are organising a community history conference to offer a further engagement which the Jewish Historical Society of England will support. This will focus on themes such as – Internment in Sussex, Reprisals against Sussex based German and Austrian Jews, Jewish soldiers and nurses and conscientious objectors identifying as Jewish.

Jewish people have been in Sussex since the 1700s, and the contribution in WWI made by Jews to the area has been significant. Follow our website to find out about events and activities between March 2019 and March 2020..

Our project partners are Jewish Care, Centre for German-Jewish Studies, and the Jewish Historical Society of England.

This project is funded by Heritage Lottery Fund through a First World War – Then and Now grant. Thanks to National Lottery players for their charitable support to help deliver this project.

We have also received funding from Jewish Care and the Sussex Record Society.

Shalom!

Strike a Light at Legacies of First World War Conference

Our creative director Nicola Benge will be speaking at the Legacies of the First World War Festival in Birmingham on 22nd and 23rd March 2019.
 
This two day community history conference is free to attend and has the noted historian David Olusoga as keynote speaker on the first day.
 
Come and experience some great histories and legacies of WWI.
You can book for any or all of the events including both conference days, and the evening event. Come join us!
 
Voices of War and Peace: the Great War and its Legacy is a First World War Engagement Centre funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council and in partnership with the Heritage Lottery Fund.
The University of Birmingham Centre is a joint initiative across the Midlands with Birmingham City University, University of Wolverhampton and University of Worcester, and further afield with Cardiff University, University of Durham, Manchester Metropolitan University and Newcastle University.
The Engagement Centre is based in the Library of Birmingham and supports a wide range of community engagement activities, connecting academic and public histories of the First World War as part of the commemoration of the War’s centenary.

The Unremembered – Labour Corps in Sussex in WWI lunchtime talk – Today!

unremembered-logo-blackv2-1.jpg
This talk is today!
Nicola Benge, Creative Director of Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage will give a free talk on the topic of Labour Corps (Service Personnel) in Sussex during WWI to commemorate this forgotten contribution during the Great War. More project information here

This is a lunchtime talk, so feel free to bring a packed lunch to munch on whilst the talk takes place. Coffee and tea will be available for donations.

Book your free place here
Monday 19th November 2-4pm – FREE
Who were the Labour Corps?:
The Labour Corps supplied the army with weapons and ammunition, food and fodder, water and fuel. They built and maintained roads and railways. They were essential to the war effort.

British and Allied Forces struggled to cope with the demand for manpower after the huge losses of men during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. From January 1917, manpower was drawn from the UK, China, India, South Africa, Egypt, Canada, the Caribbean and many other places within the British Empire.

Tens of thousands travelled thousands of miles to defend freedom and although they rarely saw service in the frontline, many died or were seriously injured. Today their contributions and sacrifice are all but forgotten. They are The Unremembered.

The aim is to raise the profile of the Labour Corps and share this learning with community groups.

Project Details:
We’re pleased to have been commissioned to become a hub in Brighton and Hove by the Big Ideas Company to develop activities with local community groups to explore the history of the Labour Corps – service personnel during World War I, and often forgotten in this part of history.

The Unremembered project background:
This project is about the Labour Corps – Service Personnel in the British Army who have been forgotten and aren’t often commemorated. The aim is to raise the profile of the Labour Corps and share this learning with community groups and draw this forgotten history into the light.

Image: Collection of John Sheen author of histories of the Northumberland Fusiliers and Durham Light Infantry.
 The Labour Corps supplied the army with weapons and ammunition, food and fodder, water and fuel. They built and maintained roads and railways. They were essential to the war effort.

British and Allied Forces struggled to cope with the demand for manpower after the huge losses of men during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. From January 1917, manpower was drawn from the UK, China, India, South Africa, Egypt, Canada, the Caribbean and many other places within the British Empire.

Tens of thousands travelled thousands of miles to defend freedom and although they rarely saw service in the frontline, many died or were seriously injured. Today their contributions and sacrifice are all but forgotten. They are The Unremembered.