Tag Archives: Dr Sam Carroll

Brighton & Hove in WWI – Free Event Day (The Orange Lilies – Brighton & Hove in the Somme): Friday 30th June 11-4pm

TOL logoThe Orange Lilies – Brighton & Hove in the Somme

Brighton & Hove in WWI –  Free Event Day

Free WWI Community history event marking the end of both The Orange Lilies project, and The Boys on the Plaque project marking the Somme centenary, and exploring Brighton & Hove in WWI.

 Venue: Jubilee Library, Brighton, 11am – 4pm – 30th June 2017 

 Speakers

Introductions by Nicola Benge, The Orange Lilies Project Manager and Clare Hankinson, The Boys on the Plaque Project Manager

Dr Frank Gray, Director of Screen Archive South East shows vintage film clips & discusses Brighton during WWI

Brighton & Hove in WWI Q & A session: chaired by Dr Sam Carroll + Speakers: Dr Chris Kempshall, Dr Alison Fell & Dr Frank Gray

Dr Alison Fell – First World War women workers and strikes

Dr Chris Kempshall of East Sussex in WWI – Talk on Brighton and The Battle of Boars Head

and speakers still TBC

With:

Battle of Boar’s Head exhibition courtesy of Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove; WWI exhibitions and resources from Brighton & Hove Libraries, Gateways to the First World War, and The Royal British Legion.

Venue –Jubilee Library, Jubilee St, Brighton BN1 1GE

Queries to: theorangelilies@gmail.com

theorangelilies.wordpress.com

https://boysontheplaque.wordpress.com

textiles workshop

The Orange Lilies project is delivered by Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage

In Partnership with Fabrica gallery, Brighton and Hove Libraries and Information Services, and Gateways to the First World War.

and funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund

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This month – Conversation Cafe with Gateways to First World War and author Douglas D’Enno

We’re hosting a Conversations Cafe with not one but two speakers this month!

The session takes place on Wednesday 13th April at Jubilee Library 2.30-4.30pm. Free to all. 

belongingWe’ll be starting a new book, a novel by local author Umi Sinha called Belonging, provided by the Brighton and Hove Libraries Service. From the darkest days of the British Raj through to the aftermath of the First World War, BELONGING tells the interwoven story of three generations and their struggles to understand and free themselves from a troubled history steeped in colonial violence. It is a novel of secrets that unwind through Lila’s story, through her grandmother’s letters home from India and the diaries kept by her father, Henry, as he puzzles over the enigma of his birth and his stormy marriage to the mysterious Rebecca.’

v0_largeWe’ll be welcoming Dr Sam Carroll of the Gateways to WWI project who will talk about the breadth of this project, and discuss aspects of their activities and experiences alongside discussions about the Great War.

Gateways to the First World War is a centre for public engagement with the First World War centenary funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). The aim of the Gateways team is to encourage and support public interest in the centenary of the First World War through a range of events and activities such as open days and study days, advice on access to materials and expertise, and signposting for other resources and forms of support.

We will also be meeting historian Douglas d’Enno, a historian, linguist and journalist who has made an exhaustive study of the impact of the First World War on Brigdownloadhton. Douglas is the author of new book, Brighton in the Great War and writes: ‘Although the impact of the Great War on Brighton was profound in many ways, the town was spared any direct attack by the enemy. The fear of spies and sabotage, however, was widespread at first and aliens were an issue which had to be swiftly resolved under new legislation. Allies, of course, were warmly welcomed, with accommodation soon being found in particular for those fleeing the catastrophic events in Belgium.’

Sessions are part of the World War I focussed Boys on the Plaque project and supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Historian Douglas d’Enno joins Conversations Cafe – April 2016

downloadWe’re pleased to add the historian Douglas d’Enno to our Conversations Cafe event for Wednesday April 13th 2.30-4.30pm at Fabrica gallery in Brighton. The event is free and all are welcome. Refreshments will be provided.

This session will also include a visit by Dr Sam Carroll of the Gateways to WWI project. Both will talk about aspects of their activities and experiences alongside discussions about the Great war.

Sessions are part of the World War I focussed Boys on the Plaque project and supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

DOUGLAS d’ENNO is a historian, linguist and journalist who has made an exhaustive study of the impact of the First World War not only on Brighton but also on Britain’s fishermen and their vessels (the first volume of his Fishermen Against the Kaiser was published by Pen & Sword in 2010, with research continuing for the second). After a career associated with publishing and – primarily – as a professional translator, he has devoted himself (freelance work permitting) to writing and research.

Through contributions in the past to The Argus and local/community publications, he has established a reputation as a leading authority on Brighton and the surrounding area. Published works include The Saltdean Story (1985), The Church in a Garden (2001), Foul Deeds and Suspicious Deaths around Brighton (published by Wharncliffe/Pen & Sword in 2004), Brighton Crime and Vice 1800-2000 (published in 2007, also by by Wharncliffe/Pen & Sword), and a number of ‘then and now’ pictorial books on the Brighton area and on Sussex. A book on the county’s railway stations through time is in preparation.

Douglas writes as follows: ‘Although the impact of the Great War on Brighton was profound in many ways, the town was spared any direct attack by the enemy. The fear of spies and sabotage, however, was widespread at first and aliens were an issue which had to be swiftly resolved under new legislation. Allies, of course, were warmly welcomed, with accommodation soon being found in particular for those fleeing the catastrophic events in Belgium.

Men flocked to the colours, with many of them making the supreme sacrifice (the names of no fewer than 2,597 of them – and three women – would be inscribed on the town’s memorial unveiled in 1922).

Brighton made a major contribution to the war effort in two other ways: by the care of the wounded (the story of the exotic Royal Pavilion being used as a hospital for Indian casualties is widely known locally) and by simply being itself: an open and welcoming resort, offering sanctuary, respite and entertainment to besieged Londoners above all but also to many others visitors, from every stratum of society.

In the background, women quietly played a vital part in areas such as transport services, industrial output and food production. Non-combatant menfolk also kept the wheels turning under very trying circumstances. When the meat shortage became acute, the Mayor himself took direct action, requisitioning ninety sheep at Brighton Station for the town which were destined for butchers’ shops in London.

Unveiling the memorial at The Steine on 7 October 1922, Earl Beatty acknowledged that ‘it was by duty and self-sacrifice that the war was won.’ It remained, he said, for those who had survived the conflict to ensure that the great sacrifices of the past, both by the dead and the living, should not have been made in vain. We remember them in this book.’

New Strike a Light Associates

Strike a Light hosts a dedicated group of related Associates who include specialists in an extensive range of related professional areas from Production Management to Arts Production to Teaching, and Administration.
This way of working means that we are flexible and adaptable, creating a bespoke team for each project. This has led us to a more efficient and economical way of working. We are a practical, friendly, and approachable team  – we care about what we do and we it shows!

We’re pleased to announce our new Associates for Strike a Light:

Associates:

Sam CarrollDr Sam Carroll managed Strike a Light’s Ale and Hearty project from August 2013 to January 2014 and also took on the role of Heritage and Education Resource Facilitator, producing the learning resource and booklet “Ale Tales”.

Sam specialises in Life History Research with a wide range of experience in both the academic and community arenas across many research projects as trainer, tutor, project worker, project manager, student mentor and consultant. She has taught on post-graduate programmes at the University of Sussex and open courses at the Mass Observation Archive. She is the Community Heritage Researcher for the AHRC funded Gateways to the First World War Engagement Centre (University of Kent) and the Administrator for the Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories (University of Brighton). 

ef1f038bc5f37e201b988d243e3a8f19Clare Hankinson has collaborated with Strike a Light on creative heritage projects in Brighton since 2010 as event organiser, project coordinator, and fundraiser. She is currently the Audience Development Manager – Older People for Fabrica, Brighton to engage older people with contemporary art.

Through this and her parallel Project Manager role, she works with artists and facilitators to explore different ways of meeting and engaging audiences, through exhibitions and events at Fabrica, other arts venues and in the community.  She is also a freelancer and artist in her own right and runs her own creative practice in a studio at Phoenix Brighton.

IMG_0068Cath Tajima-Powell worked most recently on Strike a Light’s Ale and Hearty Heritage Lottery Funded project. She has a wide base of experience working in accessible heritage events and  community projects as well as art festivals and  creative industries.

Direct engagement and good communication are the keystones for her contribution on many successful projects such as Coastal Currents Arts Festival, Stade Development, Ale and Hearty, the Martlett (HLF projects),  and Heritage Open Days. As founder of a popular local lifestyle magazine and brand she also has excellent marketing and fundraising skills.

Luan biog picLuan Blake has worked with freelancers from Strike a Light in various capacities. She is currently working on her new large scale project called Machine Women, drawing out theunheard voices and experiences of female factory workers and machinists in the UK. The project includes research, oral testimonies, clog dancing, film, installation and performance.

Luan is a performance practitioner, and was the Artistic Director of Ragroof Theatre from 2000-2012 (www.ragrooftheatre.co.uk). She led Ragroof to deliver many successful touring, heritage and participatory theatre projects in the South-East, the UK and internationally. Luan is also a freelance teacher, project manager, and volunteer co-ordinator, working within the arts and heritage sector.

Conversation Cafes – Free reminsicence sessions!

CONVERSATION CAFES

The Boys on the Plaque: Unearthing Hidden Histories of WWI Soldiers from Brighton & Hove. For those interested in finding out more about this project and these themes from WWI in the city of Brighton – join our Conversation Cafes for reminiscence activities, outings and events.

Free CONVERSATION CAFÉS taking  place on the second Wednesday of every month, beginning on Wednesday 21st October at Fabrica gallery, Jubilee Library  and other Brighton venues from 2.30-4.30pm. All welcome! 

*** See full programme of free events here: Project Dates – Conversation cafes ***

We will be hosting a series of Twelve Conversation Café’s at Fabrica from October 2015, facilitated by Nicola Benge (Strike A Light), will use Holy Trinity, the plaque and the local area to look into participant histories.

Book your free place by contacting:

Clare Hankinson, Project Manager – The Boys on the Plaque 

01273 778646 

clare.hankinson@fabrica.org.uk

https://boysontheplaque.wordpress.com/

Sessions organised in partnership with:

  • Strike A Light: A local voluntary arts and heritage organisation using people’s life stories and memories to transform public and private spaces, specialising in intergenerational projects and working with people in the third age.
  • Brighton and Hove Library Services: Jubilee and Hove Libraries: Lucy Castle and Kate Regester – Community Engagement Managers www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/libraries.org
  • University of the Third Age(U3A) Local History Group: A learning co-operative of people no longer in full time employment. With over 450 members and educational, creative and social. Alan Cooke – Chairman of Brighton and Hove U3A and Coordinator of U3A Local History Group. www.brightonandhoveu3a.org.uk

cropped-img_1310There will be talks from Dr Chris Kempshall, project Coordinator of the WWI in East Sussex project, outings to the Rare Books Archiveand more including discussions will be led around themes inspired by The Boys on the Plaque, including life in Brighton & Hove during WWI, historical experiences of ordinary men and women, and life after the war. We will also consider wider themes about the church in the community, and Holy Trinity’s history with its bi-centennial in 2017. Participants will gain an in-depth knowledge of Holy Trinity as church and gallery over the project.

Information and copies of selected heritage materials found by our research group will be shared with older and younger people through our Conversation Cafe’s and Graffiti workshops, and intergenerational groups at our free Walking Tours,  Heritage Open Days events on Thursday 10th September 2015 and Thursday 8th September 2016 and Bi-Centennial celebration in 2017, increasing the reach and impact of our research.

Through this we aim to connect people with local places associated with WWI, through investigation of our locality, sharing our findings through Walking Tours of the area and events based at Fabrica (a Grade II* listed building).

Nicola Benge (Strike a Light) will work with members of University of the Third Age and other individuals to share stories, memories, family history and local history (using information generated by the Volunteer Researchers), and take part in object handling to establish a meaningful history of ordinary people’s lives in Brighton & Hove.

These will be recorded for posterity, inform the project as a whole and will help to build a long-lasting relationship between the participants and Fabrica.

Academics, historians and researchers will be incorporated into our activities, their research and skills enabling a high quality learning experience for volunteers and participants, and significantly enriching our public programme.

Fabrica

strike_a_light_logo_transparent107x107pxBHCC Libraries

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