Upcoming oral history project

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Strike a Light just received some info about this interesting new project in the Hastings area. They’re looking for folk to get involved with their oral history project. A great way to learn new skills and work on a project of social importance and heritage.

Volunteer Role Description: Oral History Project

Role summary

An exciting opportunity to work with Hastings and Rother Rainbow Alliance, an established community group, to develop the History Project element of their work to record and promote hidden and marginalised voices from the LGB&T community.

Role description

You will work alongside the HRRA Committee and History Project volunteers to manage and develop the History Project. This will include:

  • Promoting participation in project by volunteers and interviewees
  • Undertaking oral history recording alongside other trained volunteers
  • Overseeing and undertaking transcription of oral history interviews
  • Liaising with the The Keep (historical resource centre in Falmer) regarding deposit of interviews and transcriptions
  • Applying for funding for development of the project – exhibitions, publications etc

Experience, skills and qualities required

  • In depth knowledge of LGB&T community
  • Interest in oral and community history
  • Oral history recording experience (desirable)
  • IT skills (desirable)

Training

  • Induction meeting with HRRA Committee
  • Induction with previous History Project volunteer leads

Supervision

You will report to a specific HRRA Committee member.

Location

Home based – computer and internet connection required.

Commitment

Estimated at 2-4 hours work per week, which can be undertaken flexibly.

Duration

Initial 3 month trial period, then minimum 12 months commitment.

Expenses

Expenses incurred will be refunded e.g. training, travel. Approval of all expenditure to be given in advance by HRRA Committee.

For more information and to apply contact info@hrra.org.uk or call 07824 597378 and speak to Abi Luthmann (ex-HRRA Committee member and  History Project co-lead)

 

Heritage Open Days free Brighton film showing

oh what a lovely WarFabrica Film Club free event as part of Heritage Open Days

Oh! What a Lovely War (1969, 144mins, PG)Fablogo

Fabrica Film Club is marking the Centenary of the First World War with this classic musical, directed by Sir Richard Attenborough and partly filmed on our very own West Pier of Brighton.

Based on Joan Littlewood’s 1963 stage musical, Oh, What a Lovely War! this adaptation is packed with British stars (Olivier, Gielgud, Redgraves’) follows some of the most noted stages of the war, and revolves around the marching songs of the soldiers. Filled with satire, this daring anti-war film reflects Britains experience of losing an entire generation to the conflict.

 “Oh! What a Lovely War” does recreate this time, in a bitter mixture of history, satire, detail, panorama and music. Especially music. There is something paradoxical in the thought of singing about a war, and yet cheap popular songs often capture the spirit of a time better than any collection of speeches and histories. Miss Littlewood, and Attenborough after her, present the war as a British music hall review; there’s a lot of smiling up front, but backstage you can see the greasepaint and smell the sweat, and the smiles become desperate, and there begins to be blood. - Roger Ebert

 Comfy chairs, bean bags, blankets and free nibbles. Low-cost pay bar. Doors open 6pm, film starts promptly at 6.30pm.

Film Club is free to book, but please ensure if you have booked that you come, or if you find you can’t attend, let us know so someone on the waiting list can attend instead – we hate wasted seats!

ace

 

War Stories: Voices from the First World War

four-worst-cases-brighton-hospital

Strike a Light is out and about this week and will be visiting some of the War Stories activities which are happening in and around Brighton and Hove as part of the Brighton Museum and Art gallery activities and events.

They are all free, so see you there!

12 July 2014 to 1 March 2015

Brighton Museum & Art Gallery
Free admission

Free gallery tour at Brighton Museum this Thursday about War Stories!

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War, this exhibition brings to life the wartime experiences of 13 individuals whose intensely personal memories and extraordinary stories reveal the impact of war.

The diverse voices of individuals reveal both familiar and surprising stories of a war that profoundly changed British society. See the war through the eyes of a young girl born in 1914, an Indian soldier wounded on the Western Front and taken to hospital in the Royal Pavilion, soldiers from Brighton, including a Brighton & Hove Albion footballer, nurses and a gardener who was imprisoned for his pacifist beliefs.

Personal letters, diaries, art, photography, costume, film and memorabilia evoke the love, excitement, fear, bravery, grief, loss and longing that touched the lives of millions of people.

Reflections on our personal and collective acts of remembrance and commemoration explore the continuing impact of war on our lives.

Co financed by the European Regional Development Fund and made possible by INTERREG IV A 2Seas programme.
Great War logo Interreg project logo

 

Centennial – Free Special Daytime Event at Fabrica Gallery


Centennial flyerTitle: Centennial

When: Thursday 11th September 2014 (1-4pm)

Where: Fabrica gallery, 40 Duke Street, Brighton BN1 1AG

What: Special Daytime Event – Free drop in

 

On Thursday 11th September (1-4pm), Fabrica gallery in collaboration with arts and heritage organisation Strike a Light will be hosting a free and specially created event Centennial.

Forming a part of the nationwide Heritage Open Days free events across England and Wales, this is an afternoon drop-in to commemorate the beginning of the centenary of World War I. It profiles and examines aspects of our experiences of the war through the use of diaries, moving image, wartime songs, creative workshops, and talks, exploring our shared and personal memories relating to the war, and the stories we were left with.

The event will offer art activities, film showings, workshop activities, talks, and free afternoon tea. In addition, Fabrica will be revealing a plaque honouring the parishioners who fought and died in WWI, hidden from public view for decades.                                                 

The event will be followed by a free evening film showing of musical romp Oh! What a Lovely War with low cost bar & nibbles.

Aimed at all and especially older people, visitors can relax, and encounter visual art in entrancing, fun, creative way. This event also welcomes everyone including families, babies and children of all ages. Free transport is available for the elderly and disabled. Please get in touch to arrange this.

  Book your free ticket for the daytime event here: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/centennial-tickets-11944471235

And for the free film event here: http://filmclubsept.eventbrite.com 

 To find out more about this event and others in the Special Daytime Events programme at Fabrica, please contact Clare Hankinson, Fabrica Project Coordinator on 01273 778 646 or email: office@fabrica.org.uk  Web: http://www.fabrica.org.uk

 To find out more about the arts and heritage organisation Strike a Light please contact Nicola Benge strikealight@rocketmail.com or web: http://www.strikealight.org

 

oh what a lovely War

Fabrica Film Club:

Oh! What a Lovely War (1969, 144mins, PG)

Fabrica Film Club is marking the Centenary of the First World War with this classic musical, directed by Sir Richard Attenborough and partly filmed on our very own West Pier of Brighton.

Based on Joan Littlewood’s 1963 stage musical, Oh, What a Lovely War! this adaptation is packed with British stars (Olivier, Gielgud, Redgraves’) follows some of the most noted stages of the war, and revolves around the marching songs of the soldiers. Filled with satire, this daring anti-war film reflects Britains experience of losing an entire generation to the conflict.

 “Oh! What a Lovely War” does recreate this time, in a bitter mixture of history, satire, detail, panorama and music. Especially music. There is something paradoxical in the thought of singing about a war, and yet cheap popular songs often capture the spirit of a time better than any collection of speeches and histories. Miss Littlewood, and Attenborough after her, present the war as a British music hall review; there’s a lot of smiling up front, but backstage you can see the greasepaint and smell the sweat, and the smiles become desperate, and there begins to be blood. - Roger Ebert

 Comfy chairs, bean bags, blankets and free nibbles. Low-cost pay bar. Doors open 6pm, film starts promptly at 6.30pm.

Film Club is free to book, but please ensure if you have booked that you come, or if you find you can’t attend, let us know so someone on the waiting list can attend instead – we hate wasted seats!

acestrike_a_light_logo_transparent107x107pxHOD2_MB_RGB

Fablogo

Heritage Lottery Fund profiles project

SufdReally pleased to see that the Heritage Lottery Fund have profiled a South Coast HLF funded project myself (Nicola Benge) and Esther Gill were involved with as Project Managers from 2011-13 called Speaking up for Disability.

This project was supported by a grant through their Priority Development Area grant for the charity Voice for Disability/later (Worthing based charity) Independent Lives.

This project has given disabled people living in West Sussex the chance to tell their own story. There are few records in existence that look at disability from the viewpoint of disabled people themselves because historical reports tend to have been written by hospitals, institutions and other care providers. However,this project has explored the hidden histories of disabled people looking at how their experiences of early life, school, work, families, the views of health professionals, and relationships have altered since the 1940s.

HLFHI_BLK

If you go down to the woods today …… Strike a Light recommends this Brighton Fringe Festival event

10169252_10151972202000216_115220220947594809_nStrike a Light will be off to this lovely new Brighton Fringe Festival event this weekend. Organised by a set designer who has worked for brilliant theatre company DreamThinkSpeak, it promises to be a creatively exciting and quirky event!

“If you go down in the woods today…”

Visit our little house on the edge of the woods and escape the bustle of city life.

Inside: an assortment of artisans’ work including glass, recycled jewellery, painting, photography & ceramics.

Outside in a hidden woodland: a thought provoking environmental art installation for all ages, questioning humanity using curiously familiar creatures!

Stop a while for tea and cake round the fire. Then wander through the trees to find a veritable menagerie of mysterious beasties.

10th, 11th, 17th & 18th May

11.30am to 4.30pm

46 Golf Drive, BN1 7HZ

Brighton Fringe.

 

 

Mass Observation and its’ Diarists – new event coming up

securedownloadThis promises to be an interesting event from the best selling editors who helped craft the infamous (televised by Victoria Wood) diarist Nella Last’s diaries – Strike a Light heartily recommends it!

Mass Observation and its’ Diarists

Venue: The Keep, Woollards Way, Brighton, East Sussex BN1 9BP
Date: Wednesday 14 May 2014, 6pm (6.30pm start)
Cost: £5 (includes glass of wine)
Book:  http://www.massobs.org.uk/events

Early evening lecture by Robert and Patricia Malcolmson.

Robert and Patricia Malcolmson are Social Historians and editors of numerous Mass Observation diarists including Nella Last in the 1950s:  Further Diaries of Housewife 49.The talk will focus on their use of Mass Observation and explore the diaries collected by the original Mass Observation movement (1937 – 1966).

Free car parking is available at The Keep.

Strike a Light events in 2014

Fabrica logoStrike a Light events

2014

Strike a Light has just booked a date for new events and film showings at Fabrica gallery this year for it’s special Daytime events, as part of their Growing an Older Audience project.

This will have a special World War 1 related theme – linking in with the centenary commemorations which are happening nationally in the UK between 2014-18.

The date for your diary is Thursday 11th September 1-5pm 2014.

We will be curating this daytime event, and following it up with a related evening film.

The event will host creative workshops, exhibitions, talks, and a free cafe.

This event in September will also be part of the national Heritage Open Days events.

We are currently planning this year’s theme, so please check our web pages over the summer for updates on what exciting things we are planning to have at our next event.

Aimed at all, and especially older people. Visitors can relax, and encounter visual art in entrancing, fun, creative way.

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strike_a_light_logo_colourLeitmotif front pic

ACE logo

Ale and Hearty final event – 2014

Strike a Light hosted a project book launch recently in Lewes (January 2014).

This involved a drop-in crafts workshop to make slumber pillows using heritage local hops, showcasing our Ale and Hearty project exhibition, a screening of our Ale Tales film, wild food cafe, and free beer tasting.

The hit of the evening was a round table discussion about brewing with Miles Jenner, Master Brewer from Harveys Brewery, David Muggleton – Editor of The Sussex DrinkerGodfrey Broster the brewing vicar, and John Copper of the singing Copper Family.

We had a packed house and a great time, in part due to the generous beer provisions donated by Harveys of Lewes!

Ale and Hearty was an HLF funded social history project about brewing and related agriculture and industry around Lewes.

This project is now finished – 2014

 

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Mass Observation Diary events

MO_Logo-36mm(mono)The Mass Observation Diaries, with Penny Summerfield and Dorothy Sheridan

This event comprises two talks by Penny Summerfield and Dorothy Sheridan along with a chance to look at some original diaries from the Mass Observation Archive.

Venue: The Keep, Woollards Way, Brighton, East Sussex BN1 9BP
Friday, 2 May 2014 from 13:30 to 17:00
Date: Friday 2nd May 2014, 1.30-5pm
Cost: £6

Historians and the Diary: speaking for others and blurring boundaries
Penny Summerfield, University of Manchester

Penny will be reviewing the ways that social and cultural historians have used the diary as a historical source. Such historians value diaries for the intimate glimpses of everyday life that they offer, but they vary in their concerns with the ‘representativeness’ and ‘reliability’ of diaries as historical sources. For some it is important to be able to claim that the diarists they use are representative of the population they are studying and so speak not just for themselves but for the collectivity to which they belong. Others determinedly embrace the exceptionality of the diarist. Historians also vary in their approach to reliability, especially to the issue of whether a diary is more reliable the more ‘private’ it is, raising a number of questions relating to the private/public boundary.

How do historians view the shaping of diaries by public discourses and the effects of intended (and unintended) audiences on diary-writing? And in any case how secure is the boundary between the private and the public? Some historians suggest that the concept of ‘privacy’ is not a universal and that on close scrutiny many seemingly private diaries, not least those written for Mass Observation, blur the boundary.

Penny is Professor of Modern History at the University of Manchester. She is currently working on a book about historians’ uses of personal testimony. She has worked extensively with both oral history and Mass Observation in her research on the social and cultural history of the Second World War.

Editing a diary for publication: the pleasures and pitfalls
Dorothy Sheridan, University of Sussex and Mass Observation Archive Trustee

In the second talk, Dorothy will talk about the process of making a diary public, drawing on her own experience as editor of Among You Taking Notes:  the wartime diary of Naomi Mitchison 1939-45.  She will explore her own relationship with the diary-writer during the editing process, and raise some ethical and practical questions about investments, privacy, shared authorship and diary research.

Dorothy is a Trustee of the Mass Observation Archive and an Honorary Professor of History at the University of Sussex. Her research interests include the use of life histories and she is a founding member of the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research at Sussex.

This workshop is a collaboration between the Mass Observation Archive and the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research.

http://www.sussex.ac.uk/clhlwr/courses/massobsdiaries

http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-mass-observation-diaries-with-penny-summerfield-and-dorothy-sheridan-tickets-8421915175?utm_campaign=new_eventv2&utm_medium=email&utm_source=eb_email&utm_term=eventurl_text

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