‘STASH’ Film Screening at AfrikaBa Festival plus Live Music from HKB FINN

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We’ll be showing the film Stash with musician HKB FiNN at the Electric Palace, Hastings this Saturday 6th October at 7.30pm as part of the AfrikaBa Festival.

A group of degenerates live outside of society. STASH centers on Stephanie having difficulties with love, life, her sanity and her safety. The film portrays the complexity of women in powerful positions, recognizing that strength and power can also come wrapped in soft coating and vulnerability.

HKB FiNN is a pioneering spoken word artist whose work explores universal themes of despair, joy, hope and re-affirmation of our shared humanity.

As a musician and composer, his sound encompasses Jazz, Hip Hop, Blues and Reggae. Collaborations have included: Nitin Sahwney, Nojazz, Robert Mitchell, The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, The Tunde Jegede Ensemble, The Royal Opera House, Orphy Robinson, Electro & Ntoumos.

You saw him perform previously to a full house at Electric Palace. Come hear him again introduce this his latest feature film ‘STASH’.

All tickets £10

Part of AfriKaBa Festival http://www.afrikaba.co.uk

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The Unremembered project

We’re pleased to have been commissioned to become a hub in Brighton and Hove by the Big Ideas Company to develop activities with local community groups to explore the history of the Labour Corps – service personnel during World War I, and often forgotten in this part of history.

The Unremembered project background:

This project is about the Labour Corps – Service Personnel in the British Army who have essentially been pretty forgotten and aren’t really commemorated anywhere. The aim is to raise the profile of the Labour Corps and share this learning with community groups.

Who were the Labour Corps?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image: Collection of John Sheen author of histories of the Northumberland Fusiliers and Durham Light Infantry.

 The Labour Corps supplied the army with weapons and ammunition, food and fodder, water and fuel. They built and maintained roads and railways. They were essential to the war effort.

British and Allied Forces struggled to cope with the demand for manpower after the huge losses of men during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. From January 1917, manpower was drawn from the UK, China, India, South Africa, Egypt, Canada, the Caribbean and many other places within the British Empire.

Tens of thousands travelled thousands of miles to defend freedom and although they rarely saw service in the frontline, many died or were seriously injured. Today their contributions and sacrifice are all but forgotten. They are The Unremembered.

 Events:

Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage will deliver workshops in October and November 2018 in Brighton and Hove with ten different groups in ten different venues across Brighton and Hove to look at the theme of The Unremembered and to commemorate the Labour Corps service personnel and their experiences.

We will do this through engaging with freelancers and volunteers to deliver a series of history and resource led activities which focus on the art of making articulated paper puppets (a common past time a centenary ago) with community groups and families.

These puppets will be a mixture of pre-printed on cardboard outline templates which can then be designed, created and compiled by participants and for those with dexterity issues or the very young, pre-designed printed templates which can be assembled with support and displayed.  We will use fabric scraps, wrapping paper and wall paper to create overlaid uniforms for these puppets and to bring them to life.

We will also create activities to create dressing paper dolls, so creating the one dimensional paper dolls through templates which are cut out and then one dimensional clothing made relevant to our theme which can then be folded over the puppet body. These dolls were popular during WWI and were still printed then despite paper shortages.

Both these forms of puppet making are ideal for classroom and community projects because they are made with everyday craft supplies and reused materials.

The puppet theme for this project is two-fold – one that it is an engaging and accessible way to teach young people and community groups who are unaware of this lost period of history about the Labour Corps, and secondly that the puppets can be seen as a metaphor for the role of the Labour Corps in terms of having no control over their work or location, that they were moved around like mules and essentially treated as such too. This will be a way to valorise those men and celebrate their role.

This will help to remember some of the soldiers who served with the Labour Corps and their link with Sussex and draw this forgotten history into the light.

 

 

 

 

 

AfrikaBa presents Betty: They Say I’m Different film screening

As part of the AfrikaBa Festival during Black History Month Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage will be showing this film at Electric Palace, Hastings on Friday 5th October 2018.
BETTY: THEY SAY I’M DIFFERENT

A filmic blend of documentary and animation tracing the path of the free-spirited Black Power Goddess.

PLUS Q&A WITH DIRECTOR PHILIP COX

42975834_2108175835859696_2756406716609331200_o.jpgBetty changed the landscape for female artists in America. She “was the first…” as former husband Miles Davis said.“Madonna before Madonna, Prince before Prince”.

An aspiring songwriter from a small steel town, Betty arrived on the 70s scene to break boundaries for women with her daring personality, iconic fashion and outrageous funk music.

She befriended Jimi Hendrix and Sly Stone, wrote songs for the Chambers Brothers and the Commodores, and married Miles – startlingly turning him from jazz to funk. Without Betty there would not be “Bitches Brew”. She then, despite being banned and boycotted, went on to become the first black woman to perform, write and manage herself. Betty was a feminist pioneer, inspiring and intimidating in a manner like no woman before. Then suddenly – she vanished.

Creatively blending documentary and animation this movie traces the path of Betty’s life, how she grew from humble upbringings to become a fully self-realised black female pioneer the world failed to understand or appreciate.

After years of trying, the elusive Betty, forever the free-spirited Black Power Goddess, finally allowed the filmmakers to creatively tell her story based on their conversations.

A great way to celebrate Black History Month!

Booking here: https://www.electricpalacecinema.com/whats-on/betty-they-say-im-different